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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                    PHILLIS WHEATLEY.        329

this work, as well as a fair outset.  Many have begun right
and run well for a season; but, alas, they have grown weary
in well-doing. I argue that every church is or ought to be a
temperance society. This, we rejoice to say, has ever been
the fact in relation to our own Church. Nor does it invalidate
this remark to say that some Methodists have shamefully
broken their vows and become intemperate, for the same might
be probably said of some of the members of other temperance
societies.  I further announce that every minister of Christ
should be a temperate man, and should use his influence by
preaching or writing against intemperance; and not only the
minister but every christian, war against it.  But above all,
let christians not forget that their great strength lieth in hav-
ing access to the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth. Paul may plant
and Apollos may water, but God alone can give the desired in-
crease.  Let christians, then, in private and in social circle,
remember the cause of temperance, and when assembled in
public on special occasions to pray for the success of the gos-
pel in general, or for any one christian enterprise in particular,
let then not forget to pray that God will graciously grant his
blessing upon the combined efforts of all christians to put
away the evil of intemperance from the land.


                        
                            XI.

        PHILLIS WHEATLEY-THE FIRST AFRICAN POETESS.

                BY REV. WM. H. YEOCUM, D.D.

  For a long time we had hear! some of the learned and
scholarly men and women of our race variety speak of the
poems of Phillis Wheatley, an African slave, brought from that
country when between the age of seven and eight years. In
various newspapers and periodicals we had seen references
made to her great ability--that the variety and thoughtfulness
of her poems gave every evidence or indication that, though of
ebony hue, her mind was as fertile and active as that of any
other race, of whatever color.  So anxious were we to see the
book, that we felt willing to give most any reasonable price to
obtain a copy.  We inquired at several book-stores for it, but
were informed that it was out of print.  We had heard Rt.
Rev. Daniel A. Payne refer to it in glowing terms, to stimu-
late, encourage and inspire our young men and women to seek
education;  and to my agreeable surprise, while visiting a
wealthy white family in the city of Philadelphia, Pa., and look-
ing over their large library of choice selections of valuable




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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