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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
             HISTORY OF NEGRO JOURNALISM.                315

"The  Educational Journal," recently started in Texas, are ex-
amples.  The most noteworthy of these is "The A. M. E. Church
Review," a literary journal, devoted to religious, moral, scien-
tific and social questions.  It was instituted in 1884, with Rev.
B. T. Tanner as its first editor, who, having been elected to the
Bishopric in 1888, was succeeded by L. J. Coppin, its present
editor. "The Review" has a circulation of three thousand, and
it goes to all parts of the United States, to Africa, Europe,
Canada, Nova Scotia, Bermuda, St. Thomas, British Guiana,
Hayti, and Santo Domingo. It is an example of race enterprise
and superior ability.
  In the field of Negro journalism, we find many denominational
and society papers, and even some representing different politi-
cal ideas and parties. "The Christian Recorder," "The Ameri-
can Baptist," "The Southwestern Christian Advocate," "The
Georgia Baptist," "The Star of Zion," "The National Monitor,"
are some representing different religious creeds.
 Then we have the "Journal of the Lodge," the only Negro
Pythian paper published; "The Odd Fellows' Signal," it
Cleveland, Ohio; "The Ruth Messenger," and others, represent-
ing different fraternal connections. "The American Catholic
Tribune," at Cincinnati, the only Catholic journal owned and
published by a Negro. "The St Joseph Advocate," a magazine
devoted to the interests of Catholic missions at home and
abroad, are examples of the diversity of the Negro press.
  The rapid growth of Negro journalism, due to the constantly
increasing means for the acquirement and dissemination of
education and culture, and the wonderful development and pro-
gress the Negro has made in science, art and literature, have
broadened the field of action; have brought him upon a higher
plane, and opened his way to success and happiness.
 I said that in 1870 there were sixteen Negro journals in cir-
culation, and in 1880, about thirty-six. From the list before
me, I count 118 successful journals, in active circulation; and,
taking the number published in each state, I find that Texas
heads the list, which is as follows:--Texas, 15; Pennsylvania,
10; Virginia, 8; Tennessee, 9; Ohio, 6; Arkansas,6; Louisiana,
7; Georgia,7; Illinois, 6; Missouri, 5; Kentucky, 4; Alabama, 4;
District of Columbia, 3; New York, 3; South Carolina, 3;
Indiana, 2; Maryland, 2; Mississippi, 2; Florida, 2; Colorado,
2; North Carolina, 2; California, 2; Kansas, 1; Michigan, 1;
Minnesota, 1; West Virginia, 1.
  Estimating the number of weekies in circulation at about
one hundred, and their average circulation at about three
thousand, and assuming that these pipers are read only by those
who subscribe, we have average aggregate circulation of 300,-
000, aside from the number of copies sold from the various
news-depots, and by agents, and the number of non-subscribers
who borrow them or otherwise see them.  So we see that the
number of casual readers of Negro papers is more than four
times the number of actual subscribers.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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