OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
BROWSE

MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			

                             III.

               WHO  SHALL SUCCEED MR. GRADY?

                  BY JOHN DURHAM B. S. C. E.

  If Barnum's advertising man paints forty-three stars on the
flag of the United States, people smile at his effusive pa
triotism on British soil. When Mr. Grady painted pictures of
his New South for Northern audiences, his hearers made full
allowance for the extravagance of the devoted Southerner. They
saw only his art-reviewed facts through the rose or amber tints
of their wine-glasses, and forgot, for the moment, that other pic-
ture, not fancy-made nor magnified, of Judge Lynch striding the
South, with the scales of justice sticking out of his coat-
tail pockets. Barnum's advertiser betrays his ignorance, or dis-
plays a harmless effusiveness; the late apostle of the New South
was dangerously effusive, and deliberately a false witness
against his black neighbor.
  Mr. Grady must have a successor. The industrial develop-
ment of the South requires that. What kind of a man shall the
Negro expect ? What kind of man may we reasonably hope
for ? The North must decide upon the new apostle, for he will
remain inglorious, if not mute, until Northern banqueters give
him recognition and applause.
  It would be unreasonable to expect that Mr. Grady's successor
shall be free from all of Mr. Grady's faults.  Mr. Cable has been
the pioneer of Southern white men, in attacking the Negro
question as purely an economic problem. He has been merely
fair, and just, and studious. Because of the exhibition of these
qualities, he is an exile from the South he loves so well. His
new home is in New England; yet New England diners and Bos-
ton merchants turn from their neighbor to do honor to the
Atlanta apostle.  Mr. Grady's successor cannot be a George W.
Cable, because he would be boycotted at the South and not ap-
preciated at the North. It is to be expected, therefore, that the
new apostle will have many of Mr. Grady's peculiarities.  He
must be an exponent of the sentiment which regards the Negro
as constitutionally inferior to the white man. However unfor-
tunate this may be for us, it will be necessary, in order that he
may have extended influence at home. No man of this genera-
tion can lead or even represent the Southern people, who shall
have the courage to assert the doctrine of manhood equality
from the pulpit, the forum, or the press.
  He must be bold. It was Henry W. Grady's aggressiveness
which, provoked the admiration of the North. No Negro can con-
                             (274)




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


HOME || CONTACT

http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Connection 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.