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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
314                   CHURCH REVIEW.

jot or tittle of the principles with which it started out, and has
maintained its heroic stand for the moral and material welfare
of the race. It is an example of what can be accomplished by a
oneness of purpose and aim aided by the moral force that in-
heres in right and justice. "The Sentinel is unmistakably a
power in the land.
  Cotemporaneously with "The Sentinel" was "The Globe," pub-
lished at Cleveland, Ohio, by R. A. Jones, Esq., battling for the
cause. It was a time in the history of Ohio when Republican-
ism was hidebound, and every Negro who publicly protested
against the political bossism that had so long ruled this State,
and which kept, and does yet keep, the Negroes in political
bondage, was looked upon as an outcast of society and a pitiable
object for commiseration; a miserable Democrat, pure and sim-
ple. The fear of this opinion among the Negroes allied to the
sentimentality of gratitude to the Republican party, male this
exercising of independent: political opinion an act of great
intensity. The delaration of principles that involved freedom
of thought and action in the political conduct of the Negro,
turnished material for considerable unpleasant comment, and
was in no manner conducive to gain the approbation and support
of the Negroes. Battling all this unfavorable opinion, and con-
tending for the right and the elevation of the race, "The Globe"
has been. successful as an educator, and it stands to-day daring
to proclaim the principles that underlie our success as a race.
 "The Planet," published at Richmond, Va., by John Mitchell,
Esq., is gaining considerable prominence by bravely defending
race interest in the South  The promotion of Mr. Mitchell to
its editorial chair has enthused new life into it, and has given
to it the place it now occupies among the Negro journals of
the country. At his inception, "Mr. Mitchell inaugurated a
vigorous policy, condemned the outrage  perpetrated upon the
Negroes of the South, and began a crusade against lynch-law.
"The Planet" is figuring quite prominently in the political cir-
cles of Virginia, and is successfully accomplishing its mission on
which it so boldly began "The Louisiana Standard," "The New
South," "The Independent," "The Mutual Enterprise," "The
Southwestern Christian  Advocate,", and others, are creditable
examples of Negro effort in the South today.
  Another departure  in Negro journalism is "The Freeman,"
published at Indianapolis, Ind., by E. E. Cooper, Esq. It is an
illustrated journal, devoted to science, art and literature, and
advocates political independence.  Mr. Cooper is a man of no
small ability, and is meeting with wonderful success in his new
enterprise.
 In the foregoing narrative, the writer has dwelled particu-
ly upon weekly publications. We have periodicals published
monthly,quarterly and annualy.  "The Paul Quinn monthly,"
at Waco, Texas; "Howard's Magazine" at Harrisburg,  Pa;
 "The Fisk Herald," of Fisk University; "The  A. M. E. Church
 Review," Philadelphia; "The St. Joseph Advocate," Baltimore;




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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