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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
               A RAY OF LIGHT.                      363

The dining-room, with its panelled oak ceilings, oak tables and
side-boards, adorned with massive gold and silver plate, and the
mantel, with its porcelain and alabaster adornings.
  The picture and sculpture galleries were beyond description;
she said, but the chapel she praised immoderately.  Its walls of
panelled cedar, and altar of variegated alabaster, the various
paintings of the Saviour that adorned the walls, and the fine
painting or the Ascension, that ornanented the ceiling.
  "You must have made a great sacrifice in leaving your mag-
nificent home to come to this country," remarked Sophie, after
Miss Duncan had concluded.
  "It was for Frederic's sake that we came," was the reply;
"but we are not reconciled to the change. We miss our society
greatly  auntie does'nt think it best to form any acquain-
tance here."'
  "You will find American society very diferent from that of
England," said Sophie.
  "I presume so," returned Miss Duncan. "They all associate
together here, don't they?" she asked.
  "Oh yes," replied Sophie, "all that have the right complexion,
and money enough to make the necessary display--two very
important things with this nation--the only things for which
they live. Men that were penniless when the war commenced
now find themselves comfortably rich. Many of them have
defrauded the government, but that is not considered crime.
The poorer classes  scarcely appreciate their advantages, so
anxious are they to make this display that so readily admits
them into the first society  The origin makes no difference, and
the greater part of these fashionable people would be ashamed
to say who their grandparents were, or what was their occupa-
tion. Then if they can visit Europe, the height of their ambi-
tion is reached."
  "Very few of them are ever admitted into aristocratic society
in England," said Miss Duncan. "They keep mostly by them-
selves.  English people never despise a person on account of
his color."
  "My experience of to-day has taught me that," said Sophie.
"I am perfectly unable to express my gratitude to your aunt
for her great kindness."
  "Auntie is a, model of benevolence," said Miss Duncan.
"Nothing gives her more pleasure than to make others happy.
She never gives ostentatiously; but, from her abundant means.
she of ten makes worthy people happy. Experience has taught
her well the meaning of those beautiful words: 'It is more
blessed to give than to receive."
  "Noble woman!" returned  Sophie, with much feeling;" she
will reap a rich reward."
  Mrs. Ashley's kind heart would have thrilled with delight,
had she been near and witnessed the joy that her recent kind-
ness had occasioned in the unfortunate Leland family, and
heard the blessings which they poured forth upon her.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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