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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
332                 CHURCH REVIEW.

        Unhappy we the setting sun deplore,
        So glorious once, but oh! it shines no more.
  Think of a woman, without education and scholastic train-
ing, admiring, appreciating the learning, the eloquence of siith
a man as Whitefield. She was to the race two things, of which
we may justly be proud.  First, she may be styled the first
poet of the race; and second, she was among the first to ad-
mire education.
 Still another on the giant  Philistine warrior, Goliath of
Gath, (1st Sam., chap. xvii):
     Ye martial pow'rs, and all ye tuneful mine,
        Inspire my song, and aid my high design.
        The dreadful scenes and toils of war I write,
        The ardent warriors, and the fields of fight;
        You best remember, and you best can sing
        The acts of heroes to the vocal string;
        Resume the lays with which your sacred lyre,
        Did then the poet and the sage inspire.

We are forced to give one more:

    THOUGHTS ON THE WORKS OF PROVIDENCE.
         
      But see the sons of vegetation rise,
      And spread their leafy banners to the skies.
      All-wise, Almighty Providence we trace,
      In trees, and plants, and all the flowery race,
      As clear as in the nobler frame of man,
      All lovely copies of the Maker's plan.
      The power the same that forms a ray of light,
      That call'd creation from eternal night
      "Let there be light!" He said; from His profound
      0ld Chaos heard, and trembled at the sound;
      Swift as the world, inspir'd by pow'r dine,
      Behold the light around its Maker shine! 
      The first fair product of th' omnific God,
      And now through all his works diffus'd abroad.
                           
  Without school education and special training, we  do not
believe it can be shown that another of any other race has
given signs of such an aesthetic and poetical turn of mind, and
at the same time give their imaginative thoughts to a reading,
prejudicial, and criticising public. Every race of men are
judged by the amount of thought and opinion they give to the
world, on religion, government, morals, virtue, science and art
On all these the race has produced some men and women of
great ability, whose names will go down upon the pages of
history, shining with luster and credit to themselves, and honor
to the race; by which the coming millions of the next hundred




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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