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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
        HISTORY OF NEGRO JOURNALISM.                 311

press finally began to drift westward. In 1847, Martin R.
Delaney began the publication of the "Mystery" at Pittsburg,
Pa.; but a little prior and cotemporaneously with the "Mys-
tery," "The Elevator" was in existence at Albany, N. Y., pub-
lished by Stephen Myers; likewise, "The Anglo-African," the
first Negro magazine, was being published by Thomas and Rob-
ert Hamilton.  The "Mystery" was a wide-awake paper, and
Martin R. Delaney, its editor, was a man of the times, earnest,
fearless and able.  The "Mystery" met with the same fate as
do many of our journals today--lack of proper supports
  In 1846, Thos. Van Rensaeler published the "Ram's Horn,"
at New York city. It was a lively, out-spoken journal, devoted
principally to the up-building of Negro society and Christian
principle. It ran until 1854 or'55. Rensaeler was aided in his
efforts by Mr. Douglass and Mr. Willis Hodge.
  In 1848, Samuel R. Ward began the "Impartial Citizen," at
Syracuse, N. Y. It advocated political action against slavery,
and clamored for Negro citizenship. Mr. Douglass says: "To my
mind, Ward was the ablest black man the country has ever
produced."
  In 1851 and '52, Louis IH. Putnam ran the "Colored 'Man's
Journal," in New York city. It continued its regular appear-
ance until the outbreak of the civil war.
  In the meantime, there sprang into existence "The Philadel-
phia Citizen," and "Freeman;" "!The Phalanx," at New York
city; "The Elevator," at Baltimore, and a little paper, published
at Cincinnati, Ohio, called "The Central Star;" but owing to the
great national agitation over the all-absorbing question of
slavery at this time, and considering the limited sphere in which
the Negro press was compelled to exist, those that could eke out
a pitiable and quiet existence lived only to be wiped out by the
onslaught of the civil war. They were crushed out; the crisis
was too great for them, and they fell by the hand of popular
indignation. Their tenacity to the cause of abolition was over-
powered by the spirit of pro-slavery. The din of war was re-
sounding too fiercely to admit of a successful continuance.
  During the war, the number of Negro papers was compara-
tively small, there being but about three or four in existence.
  After Lee had made his notorious surrender, and the country
had subsided into peaceful tranquility, and slavery had been
wiped from the statute books of the nation, Negro journalism
took another rise. Among those that made their appearance at
this time, and that are now in active circulation, are "The
Elevator," at San Francisco, "The Southwestern Christian
Advocate," at New Orleans, and "The Colored American." We
learn that "The Colored American" was about the first effort
at Negro journalism in the South after the rebellion. It was
published at Macon, Georgia, by Jno. T. Shufton, an ex-slave.
Shufton was an able writer naturally, and he labored under
many  inconveniences  "The  Colored American"  lived only
four years, having been forcibly suspended on account of cer-
tain political complications into which it had fallen.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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