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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
378                   CHURCH REVIEW.

years ago compelled the enactment of laws by the Congress, ex-
cluding the Chinese from this country, is becoming more and
more pronounced. This same sentiment asserts that Afro-
American citizens are an alien race and must be driven, coaxed,
or purchased out of the country. To this end, two Senators
have already, upon the threshold of the Fifty-first Congress,
introduced two measures looking towards the expatriation of
Afro-American citizens.
  There is abundance of work for the Afro-American League
to do. The people are aroused to the great necessity of organ-
ized effort, directed by wise, sober and discreet men, who
will place the imperilled rights and interests of the race be-
fore all other considerations of whatever sort, and will con-
tend for them, whatever circumstance of trial or danger may
befall them in the work.



         A TWO MONTHS'VISIT IN THE SOUTH.

  It will be remembered that, in 1863, the landscript appropri-
ation was made by Congress to the various States, for educa-
tional purposes. The appropriation was given upon the basis
of population. At a State convention, in 1870, Georgia decided
to adopt Atlanta University as the school through which to
use the portion due to the colored population.  From  that
time till 1887, Atlanta University was the recipient of $8,000
annually, which was, of course, very helpful in the educational
work of the school. But as the children of the professors who
live at the University, attend school there, the point was raised
that the money was not being applied strictly in accordance
with the original purpose, as $8,000 was the amount which be-
longed to the colored population. By an act of the Legislature,
the appropriation was withheld; so there are $16,000 for school
purposes, unappropriated. At the last session of the Legisl&
tare, the Commit7e on Education, of the House, recommended
that the amount, hitherto given to the Atlanta University, be
hereafter given to Morris Brown College.  The recommendation
received the favor of Governor Gordon and many of the influ-
ential men of the State. When the matter was voted upon in
the House of Representatives, it was carried in favor of Morris
Brown, by an overwhelming majority, but was defeated by the
vote of the Senate. At the next session of the Legislature, the
amount unappropriated will be $24,000. What will finally be
done with this annual appropriation of $8,000? is a question of
no litte concern to the citizens of Georgia, and, indeed, all
who are interested in the educational improvement of our peo-
ple in the South.  After a careful and impartial survey of the
situation, the Review is of the opinion that the most appropri-
ate thing to do will be to make the appropriation to Morris
Brown College.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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