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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                              XV.
                         Editorial
                     __________________ 
                              
             "AN APPEAL TO PHAROAH," ANSWERED.

  The latest publicaion upon  the "Negro problem," is a book of
two hundred pages from an anonymous writer  As it treats the
subject in an entirely new way, and is the first publication we
have seen that recommends the emigration to Africa of the entire
people, at the expense of the government, we gave it a very care-
ful perusal.
  All things considered, it is a remarkable production.  The
author claims to utterly discard sentimentality, and dealing only
with facts, offers a radical solution of the problem about which
so much has been said and written.
  Much of interest is lost in studying the views herein presented
from the fact that the author is unknown. It does seem rather
strange, that one so sanguine and sincere as this writer assumes.
to be, should object to allowing the country and the world to
know his name as well as his views. The book is divided into
twelve chapters.  The discussion is consecutive, and for the most
part logical.  Many familiar facts are dealt with in a new and!
attractive way.   Many conclusions which work both against
the Negro and white man, are unanswerable. The chapters are
(1) A sectional union; (2) The divisional line; (3) The continuing
cause; (4) A race question; (5) The Negro's condition and posi-
tion; (6) Race prejudice, South and North; (7) A trilemma; (8)
The radical solution; (9) Reckonings of numbers; (10) Reckonings
of cost; (11) Will he go ? (12) Our duty.
  We appreciate the author's ability to discover and define
difficulties, but must differ radically from him in many of his
conclusions, which to him are inevitable. We have reached the
place now, where we must face the music of citizenship. If the
country could not remain "half slave and half free," neither can
the Negro. The opposition to the full and complete citizenship
of the colored man, is making its death struggle, and neither the
colored man himself, nor his friends can afford to beat a retreat.
It cost both the Negro and the country too much, to lightly go
back on what has been done.  It is folly, worse than folly, to
say that the colored man in this country has had a fair trial
and an ample opportunity to prove whether or not he is worthy
of citizenship. Without bringing any sentiment whatever into
the question, it is simply impossible for a people deprived of
educational advantages for so many years, as were the colored
                              (371)




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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