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Will the Afro-American Return to Africa?
			
     THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE A. M. E. CHURCH.            391

of the sort. Enough ships could not be put into commission,
without demoralizing the commerce of the world, to transport,
annually, the natural increase of the Afro-American population.
A statistician has been at the pains of demonstrating this fact.
  When the question of expatriating Afro-Americans was being
discussed in the Congress, a remarkable feature was made prom-
inent. Most of the leading newspapers in the Southern States
opposed the proposition and characterized it as being unwise, the
consummation of which would disorganize and demoralize the
entire industrial system of the South. A great many people, who
cannot sleep because of the presence of the Afro-American
among them, will not take the trouble to ascertain that the Afro-
American is the backbone of the labor force of the South, and
that if he should fold his hands and sit down for a week the
wheels of Southern industry would cease to turn for that length
of time, and that millions of wealth would, in consequence, stand
idle throughout the Republic. But what do such people care
about facts? Humbug is their stock-in-trade.
  Will the Afro-American return to Africa?
  He will not.
  I will not here enter into a discussion of the missionary
question. In the years to come, when we shall not need every
decent missionary that we manufacture for home consumption,
we will contribute our proper share of noble men and noble
women, and of our abundance, to the evangelization of Africa.
  New York.




                             IV.
           THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE AFRICAN
                       M. E. CHURCH.

    BY REV. WM. D. JOHNSON, D.D., SECRETARY OF EDUCATION.

                          PRELUDE
  EDUCATION is work; and work is overcoming difficulties.
Rev. J. S. Flipper, in an address delivered January 1, very prop-
erly said : "In order to tell the progress of the Negro, you must
measure the depths whence he came." At the organization of
the A. M. E. Church, in Philadelphia, April, 1816, of the sixteen
delegates present there was but one educated man.      "In 1818
there was found no one in the Baltimore Annual Conference
competent to act as secretary; therefore, the youthful son of
Bishop Allen, a lad of fourteen years, was constituted secretary.




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, [Vol.08, Num. 4]

Will the Afro-American Return to Africa?

Thomas

Volume:  08
Issue Number:  04
Page Number:  387
Date:  04/1892


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