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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
         LIFE OF MISS HALLIE QUINN BROWN.            261

The readings of Miss Hallie Q. Brown were grand.--Urbana,
0., "Democrat."
  The elocutionary entertainment given by  Miss Hallie Q.
Brown, a graduate of Wilberforce, was worth double the price
of admission.  She has a wonderful voice, and a culture to match
it. An educated and much-traveled gentleman, who has listened
to all the most noted elocutionists in this country and Europe,
was so enthusiastic over Miss Brown's rendition of the "Church
Bells," that he declared he never saw or heard it equaled; that
her manner, voice and gesture were all superior to anything he
had ever listened to or hoped  to hear.--Richmond,Ind.,
"Paladium."
  Miss Brown is quite tall, has auburn hair, a keen eye, a voice
of remarkable compass, and features of great mobility.  Her
selections were as follows:  "The Last Hymn." 'The Love
Letter," "How He Saved St. Michael's"--a thrilling story in
verse, relating how this famous Charleston, S. C., church was
saved front fire by the daring act of a slave--"Jemima's Court
ship," "Curfew Must Not Ring To-night"--in which she ex-
hibited intense  dramatic  power--"Ameriky's  Conversion,"
"Uncle Daniel's Vision," "The Little Hatchet," and "The Creeds
of the Bells."  Miss Brown stands, by far, above the readers we
are accounted to hear.-WVashl ington, D.C., '"Advocate2"
Several of our prominent citizens were present, who were
greatly delighted with the skillful and accomplished manner
with which Miss Brown rendered the varied styles of elocu-
tion.-New Haven, Conn., "Paladium."
  Miss Hallie Q. Brown, the subject of this sketch, is a product
of Wilberforce University, from which institution she was grad-
uated with the degree B.S. Since then, the degree of M.S. has
been conferred upon  her.  Miss Brown is, at present, the
Principal of the Ladies' Department of Allen University, and
Instructor in Elocution.
 The careful, Christian training of a wise and faithful mother
puts a child on high vantage ground in the beginning.  We
must, therefore, first accord full credit to Miss Brown's mother,
for the beautiful home education which she received in her early
childhood. After this, the honor belongs to her noble "Alma
Mater," Wilberforce, for making her what she is.
  Besides her literary attainments, Miss Brown is a skillful
painter, and in art needlework she rivals the women of old. Two
of her pieces of embroidery were awarded the prize at the State
Fair in Columbia, S. C., where she had the honor of being the
only colored contributor.
  An accomplished dramatic reader, an affectionate and faithful
daughter,an earnest Christian worker, Wilberforce may well
point to her with pride and say: "Give her of the fruit of her
hands, and let her own works praise her in the gates."




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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