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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
              PHILLIS WHEATLEY.                      331

family, that it has been asserted times without number, that
the Negro was created inferior by his Maker. But no one can
believe this who has read of the former civil governments
among the African races, namely, Ethiopia, Nubia, Libya,
Egypt, Phoenicia, Carthage and Merve. Without spending
time to elaborate on these, we  simply ask those who  are
prejudiced against the race to read history, for a specimen of
Africa's great men; of statesmen, of soldiers, of scholars, men of
science, able writers, poets and novelists. And we cannot pass
over the men of to-day, who, according to their chances, are
(equal to) the best of any race. The learned, eloquent ministers
men who  have filled prominent positions  as  statesmen,
thoughtful pointed editors and writers; the scholars, teachers,
doctors  and lawyer of this race variety is a strong denial of
inferiority. And these are some of the sure evidences that what
Africa has been in the ages past it may be again in the near
future.
  We have thought that it is good for persons who write poetry
to forget what they write; for then it seems to us that they are
not so liable to repeat themselves. This volume of Phillis
Wheatley contains thirty-seven poems, and the variety of her
subjects will convince the learned and thoughtful of any race
that she had an active giant mind  We  give below a few
quotations from this rare volume.

                         ON VIRTUE.
      O ! Thou bright jewel, in my aim I strive
      To comprehend thee. Thine own words declare,
      Wisdom is higher than a fool can reach.
      I cease to wonder, and no more attempt
      Thine height t'explore, or fathom thy profound
      But, 0, my soul, sink not into despair!
      Virtue is near thee, and, with gentle hand,
      Would now embrace thee--hovers o'er thine head.
      Fain would the heav'n-born soul with her converse,
      Then seek, then court her for her promised bliss.
  It is now about one hundred and twenty years since Rev.
George Whitefield visited this country, and we suppose Phillis
Wheatley had the pleasure of seeing and hearing this learned,
eloquent divine, while he was visiting Boston Read the folloW-
ing, "On the death of Rev. Mr. George Whitefield, 1770:"
         Hail, happy saint! on thine immortal throne,
         Possest of glory, life, and bliss unknown,
         We hear no more the music of thy tongue;
         Thy wonted auditories cease to throng.
         Thy summons in unequall'd accent flow'd,
         Thou didst, in strains of eloquence refind,
         Inflame the heart, and captivate the mind.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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