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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
348                   CHURCH REVIEW.

  "Mother did, I know, and she was a fool for so doing," re-
turned the young lady, who seemed thoroughly provoked at
this change in affairs. "It seems to me," she continued, pet- 
tishly, "it takes a long time for Horace Irving to recover from
the shock of his uncle's death. He promised to write soon, and:
no letter has reached me yet." 
  "I should think you and Horace might as well be married
now, as any time," remarked Mrs. Carleton.  It would be very
improper to make any display at this time, and it would greatly
relieve our embarassments."
  "I think so, too," replied Alice. "I expect he is going to pro-
pose it, for he wrote that he had a very important communi-
cation to make to me.  If he don't propose it, I shall give him a
broad hint.  But I am sure he will," she added, after a thought.
ful pause. "Then I shall be mistress of as fine an establishment
as Mrs. Warren, or any of our fashionable friends."
  The thread of their existence seemed to hang on this letter;
still it came not.
  "What can it mean?" exclaimed Alice, one morning. "Horace
Irving's conduct drives me almost to distraction!"
  "I hope he means no ill by it," said her mother. "I don't
want to think him dishonorable; still, his silence troubles me."
  "A letter! a letter, Alice!" cried Georgie, one morning, enter-
ing the library where her mother and sister sat.
  Alice sprang forward, seized it, and retired to a distant corner,
concealing herself nearly from view in the rich curtains of the
bay window. Glancing hastily at the outside, she tore open
the envelope, and commenced reading.  This letter was sup-
posed to contain something of the greatest importance, and
Mrs. Carleton and Georgie waited the result anxiously.
  Alice read for some time in silence, when suddenly she sprang
from her seat, and, with flushed face, exclaimed: "Mean, con-
temptible wretch!"
  "Why, Alice, what is the matter?" asked her mother, in alarm,
going towards her.
  "Read that, and see!" exclaimed the young lady, tossing the
letter rudely across the room; then throwing herself on the sofa,
she buried her face in the folds of her mourning-bordered hand-
kerchief, sobbing aloud.
  Mrs. Carleton snatched the letter and read it eagerly; then
sinking into a seat near her daughter, she cried out: "What
shall we do? what will become of us?" 
  "'Mother, what is it? pray, tell!" exclaimed Georgie, trembling
in every limb.
  "Horace wants to break the engagement," she added, sobbing
piteously. Then followed a scene, which, had Horace Irving wit-
nessed, no doubt he would have revoked his decision.  When
calmness was in a measure restored, Mrs. Carleton remarked to
Georgie:
  "It is evident that Horace Irving is no gentleman; we have
been greatly deceived in him.  A part of this letter seems to be




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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