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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
382                   CHURCH REVIEW.

ing his noble ambition. For this practical work of philan-
thropy, the "Century" managers are directly responsible. With
the fervent sympathy, which can come only from a people op-
pressed as we have been in this country, we commend the noble
enterprise of this great magazine The December issue has
Lincoln, Joseph Jefferson, and the Duke of Wellington as the
characters of biographical treatment. Henry Gervex and Alfred
Stevens prove themselves to be admirable collaborateurs in their
"Paris Panorama of the Nineteenth Century."  The story of
the Croton Aqueduct is told with a minuteness of detail and
in popular language. The entire issue deserves extended com-
ment for the literary and artistic quality of its contents. A
striking portrait of Wellington is the frontispiece.

  "Scribner's Magazine" appears in new dress, and its contents
make quite the equal of more expensive periodicals.
  The "North American Review" for November is a very in-
teresting number. It is not easy to decide which is the best
of the many good articles it contains from pens of distinguished
writers. It begins with a symposium upon divorce, that ques-
tion which has so much to do with the well-being of society.
The Roman Catholic view is given by Cardinal Gibbons; the
Episcopal view is given by Bishop Potter, of New York; and
the Agnostic view, by Colonel Robt. G. Ingersoll. The two for-
mer take the Christian view of the sacred relation of marriage,
and make a strong defense for the home and for society. The
Colonel easily breaks the wedding knot whenever it becomes
necessary (?) for the contracting parties. The family is at the
very foundation of civilization, therefore no civilization can be
stronger or better than the family. The more easily a divorce
can be obtained, the more careless, and even reckless, men and
women will become in making selections of companions. While
we are not prepared to say that a divorce should not be granted
under any circumstances, yet, we think that the rule laid down
in the Bible is a safe one. No one may hope to improve upon
it, and no christian should presume to try.

  The "Andover Review" is, as usual, replete with thoughtful
and well-written articles. Among them, "Pulpit Prayer" de-
serves to be widely read and appreciated. I have many a time
heard some "learned divine" make a sly speech to the audience,
while he was ostensibly "addressing a Throne of Grace." "The
Spectre of Negro Rule" is equally as deserving of close atten-
tion and wide reading. The writer says:
  "They are making very encouraging progress in education and
the accumulation of property. Their religious habits, though
far from what could be wished, are much less than formerly
characterized by superstitious and hysterical extravagances.
One, like myself, acquainted with them in the days of their bond-
age, or just after, and who observes them now, is struck by their




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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