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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                             XIV.
                          Miscellaneous
                      
            GENERAL WASHINGTON AND RICHARD ALLEN.

  This historic address is from a framed copy of the, Philadlel-
plhia Gazette," dated Tuesday, December 31st, 1799, and is the
property of Tamany Peashore Co., Camden Co., N.J.  Through
tle  kindness of Mr. Jno. S. Waters, caterer, of 1726 Addison
Street, Philadelphia, we obtained the original, from which the
following is a facsimile copy:
  "On Sunday, the 29th of December,1799, in the African Meth-
odist Episcopal Church of this city, the Rev. Richard Allen, of
the African race, and minister of the said church, in his discourse
to the people of color, took notice of the death of George Wash-
ington, that melancholy event which clothes the American people
with mourning, and he has been prevailed upon to admit the fol-
lowing sketch of his discourse to be published. It will show
that the African race participate in the common events of our
country; that they can rejoice in our prosperity, mourn in our
adversity, and feel with other citizens the propriety and neces-
sity of wise and good rulers, of an effective government, and of
submission to the laws and government of the land.
  'At this time, it may not be improper to speak a little on the
late mournful event--an event in which we partcipate in common
with the feelings of a grateful people--an event which causes
'the land to mourn,'in a season of festivity. Our father and
friend is taken from us--he whom the nations honored is 'seen
of men no more.'
  We, my friends, have peculiar cause to bemoan our loss. To
us he has been the sympathizing friend and tender father.  He
has watched over us, and viewed our degraded and afflicted
state with compassion and pity. His heart was not insensible to
our sufferings.  He, whose wisdom the nations revered, thought
we had a right to liberty. Unbiased by the popular opinion of
the State in which is the memorable Mount Vernon, he dared to
do his duty, and wipe off the only stain with which man could
ever reproach him.
  And it is now said by an authority on which I rely, that he
who ventured his life in battles--whose 'head was covered' in
that day, and whose shield the 'Lord of hosts' was, did not fight
for that liberty which he desired to withhold from others. The
bread of oppression was not sweet to his taste, and he 'let the
oppressed go free;' he 'undid every burden;' he provided lands
                             (365)




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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