OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
BROWSE

MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
         HISTORY OF NEGRO JOURNALISM.               313

sas City, Missouri, and many others, supplemented by the al-
ready existing New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washing-
ton and several Southern journals, marks the greatest era in
the history of Negro journalism.
  During this decade, the noteworthy addition to the Negro
press was the "New York Globe," later the "Freeman," and
subsequently, "The Age," or, in other words, "Fortune's Paper."
It was a "battering ram" to prejudice, lawlessness, and injustice.
In 1882, in conjunction with Geo. Parker and W. W. Sampson,
T. Thomas Fortune undertook the publication of "The Rumor,"
in New York city, shortly afterwards changed to the "Globe."
Mr. Fortune had the editorial management, and here began the
brilliant career which won him recognition as the leading jour-
nalist of the race.
  Internal dissensions and other causes brought about a dissolu-
tion of partnership in the "Globe," and a subsequent suspen-
sion of the paper; whereupon Mr. Fortune began the publica-
tion of the "New York Freeman," a new paper to take the place
of the "Globe," under his sole ownership. "The Freeman"
was considered one of the boldest and ablest journals published
by the race.
  In 1889, Mr. Fortune turned the publication of "The Free-
man" over to his brother, E. Fortune, Jr., and J. B. Peterson,
who changed the name of it to its present name, "The Age,"
and accepted a position on the staff of the N.Y. daily "Sun,"
having free access to its editorial columns.  His brother's
health having failed in February, 1889, Mr. Fortune resumed the
management of "The Age," besides contributing daily to the
"Sun."  His fearless manner of proclaiming his beliefs under
any circumstances gives an added weight to his paper. Mr.
Fortune has always been a freetrader and a civil-service re-
form advocate, and, having a high opinion of his race, has
always aimed to accomplish what benefits there are in store for
it. Bold and keen-sighted, he has, through the medium of his
publications, made a history, not only for the race, but for his
paper. "The Age" stands to-day as one of the operating levers
in the hands of the race.
  During this season of great political excitement in the South,
the greatest stride in Negro journalism was made, and as they
increased, the status of the Negro advanced-he became a more
important factor in the nation.
  In 1884, "The Philadelphia Sentinel" sprang into being, pub-
lished by G. W. Gardner and A. J. Jones.  "The Sentinel"
marks a new departure in Negro journalism, it being about
the first independent Negro paper published. It launched upon
the journalistic sea, midst threats of destruction and prophesies
of sudden failure. At that time, there were many indepen-
dents in the country, but the majority of the Negroes were hos-
tile to anything thai savored or looked like Democracy, and the
healthy existence of "The Sentinel" was yet to be attained.
It ploughed its way up into public favor, without the loss of a




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


HOME || CONTACT

http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Connection 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.