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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
306                   CHURCH REVIEW.

a daily paper, five hundred feet high on the Eiffel Tower, and
bottle up the accents of the human voice in Edison's phono
graph! It is in contemplating these great achievements that we
can in some small way measure the glory and grandeur of man;
that indeed, and in truth, he is created but a little lower than
the angels.
   "Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs,
    And the thoughts of men are broadened with the process of the suns."
  What a rebuke to the pessimist, and those who take a low and
desponding view of the progress of mankind! We look at this
exposition, teeming with innumerable specimens of human
activity, and remember that there is not a machine, not an ex-
hibit, that is not the slowly elaborated growth of an infinitude
of tentative experiments, every one of which, by its very im-
perfections, move mankind by pain and suffering to something
better; thus it is "We rise on stepping-stones of our dead selves
to higher things." To have gained some insight into these
great truths; to have more fully realized the helpful brother-
hood of mankind, and to have formed a more vivid conception of
the reality of that slow but sure evolution to which we all as-
pire, is one of the chief lessons of this magnificent exposition.

               
                            VI.

        THE OLD AND NEW COMMANDMENTS; OR, BROTHER-
           HOOD IN CREATION AND BROTHERHOOD IN
                    CHRIST COMPARED.

                   BY T. G. STEWARD.

  In the first Epistle General of John, second chapter, seventh
and eighth verses, we real the following words: "Brethren,
I write no new commandment unto you, but an old command-
ment which ye had from the beginning. The old commandment
is the word which ye have heard from the beginning. Again,
a new commandment I write unto you, which thing is true in
 Him and in you, because the darkess  is past and the true light
Shineth".
  In this passage, we have a referene to the Old Commandment
and to the New Commandment  The Old Commandment is the
word which had been "'heard from the beginning."  The New
Commandment was that which John was writing, and which he
says "is true in Him and in you"--true "because the darkness
is past and the true light shineth."
The Old Commandment, then, is the word which the disciples
of Jesus to whom John wrote, had had and had heard from the




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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