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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                       EDITORIAL                         377
  If the American government ever becomes strong enough to
stand by its own enactments, and protect all its citizens; and if,
North and South, the Negro is let alone, and permitted to work
out his own destiny under the laws that govern all citizens, then
will the solution come by the eternal law of "the survival of the
fittest."  The sooner all concerned come to this conclusion, the
sooner will we have that peace and  union which alone are wor-
thy of acceptation.


             THE AFRO-AMERICAN LEAGUE.

 We congratulate Mr. T. Thomas Fortune, of the New York
"Age," for the energetic and thorough manner in which he has
arranged for the convention of his League at Chicago, on the
fifteenth of January. He deserves the ardent support of the
colored people throughout the country. He is one man who
has made personal sacrifices in his effort to secure united ac-
tion for the alleviation of the wrongs which we suffer as a
people throughout the United States. His fine ability, nerve
and pluck embody the snap of a watch-spring. He is wound
up and in good running order. His League is bound to go.
  The interest and enthusiasm with which the call for a meet-
ing of the Afro-American Leagues in the several States; to con-
vene at Chicago, January 15, 1890, for the purpose of effecting
a national organization, has been received by the race  in every
section of the country, is one of the most remarkable and sig-
nificant manifestations of awakened manhood shown by the
iace since or before the war. The unanimity with which the
people have responded to the call for national organization
effectually disposes of the belief, long current and firmly rooted,
that the Afro-American was constitutionally incapable of
grasping the potentialities of cooperation and of turning
them to advantage. To be sure, the great work to be done
by the League remains to be subjected to the crucial test of
practical demonstration; but, as a matter of fact, the victory is
more than half assured in all such efforts when large masses of
men, widely separated and differently circumstanced, begin to
think in a given groove, and to declare their readiness to move
together as one man, to accomplish a given result. That the
race has reached this point today, and will meet in convention
to perfect a permanent organization, which shall put to the
test its capacity for intelligent and uncompromising contention,
for absolute justice under the Constitution, marks a tremendous
advance in all the elements of strong, resourceful and aggres-
sive manhood.
  No race ever had more aggravating incentives to rise to the
full statue of manhood. It is a matter not of citizenship simply,
but of life itself. The un-American sentiment, which a few




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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