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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
352                    CHURCH REVIEW.

such a place as that, and wealth and taste combined is just
what is needed for it."
  "The idea of their being there troubles me more than the looks
of the place," said Mr. Shirley. "Isn't there some way we can
prevent them from taking possession ?"
  "No way, unless we buy them out," returned Mr. Chapin.
  "That is impossible," said Mr. Shirley, "for there are but few
men who have the means to do it.  There ought to be a law to
prevent it. So provoking!" he muttered to himself, as he walked
slowly up the aisle and ascended-the platform.
  On leaving the church, after service, he came suddenly upon a
group of ladies engaged in earnest conversation.
  "Well, ladies,"' said he, "what is the subject of discussion
now ?"
  "Oh, the everlasting nigger !" replied Mrs. Leslie.
  "The ladies smiled.
  "That has troubled me considerably this evening," he re-
marked; "at the close of my prayer I like to have said nigger."
  And these refined ladies laughed heartily at the wit displayed
by the eminent divine.
  The next day the city of B----- was in a state of intense
excitement over the news. The sale of Oakland was discussed
from the wealthiest citizen down to the poorest mechanic. All
sorts of stories concerning the new owner were in circulation,
and had he been in the city he might have considered himself
quite an important personage for causing such a stir among a
portion of the great American people. Several of the citizens
went so far as to send threatening and abusive letters to the
agent for selling the property, when it was left with him for
that purpose.
  During the first of the next month, some of the gentleman's
servants arrived, among them the steward and housekeeper.
Yankee curiosity was so great, that several of the citizens took
the pains to go to Oakland, to inquire of them abont the owner.
The little information they gained satisfied them somewhat,
and they awaited his arrival with considerable composure.-
  Days and weeks passed, but instead of the owner, there
arrived several fine English horses, and other choice stock;
also loads of huge boxes, trunks and packages; much curiosity
was manifested regarding the contents of these by the gossiping
neighbors.
  Shortly after this, Mr. Ashley, the new owner of Oakland,
arrived, in company with a gentleman, each having a servant.
He was a tall, handsome young man, with gentlemanly carriage
and dignified bearing; still, the appearance of so many wild
beasts uncaged, into the city, could not have caused more terror
and alarm among its citizens.  He was rich--immensely so
and they dreaded, yet feared him,
  The question now arose, who could his companion be? cer-
tainly not a relative, for he was surely white!
  Mr. Chapin could stand it no longer; so one morning, a few




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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