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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
               A RAY OF LIGHT.                       345

bark for sea. After an absence of three years I returned,
formed the acquiaintance of some fast young men from whom I
learned I the art of gambling in all its branches.
  I was called extremely handsome, was very fond of dress, and
consequently had but little trouble in forcing my way into very
good society. I soon married a young girl who had a few thou-
sanll at her command.  There were a number of young ladies
who were more fashionable, and ranked higher in society, that I
could have married; but like all butterflies, they possessed noth-
ing in the world but their fine attire, so I chose the despised
shop-girl or rather her money.
  But five thousand dollars is a paltry sum," he continued, "and
in less than two months every dollar was spent  Some of my
companions planned a robbery.  I readily agreed to assist them,
We were very unfortunate, for we were detected in the act, tried,
and sentenced to three years' imprisonment each.
  On coming from prison, I made no inquiry concerning my
wife, but went to another city and soon married again.  My
wife was rich, much older than I, but her peculiarities greatly
annoyed me.  So, after a while, I left her, and came to this city,
changing my name to avoid detection.
   I afterwards went south, in the employ of a very wealthy.
gentleman, where I remained for a number of years. The gentle-
man's wife admired me much, and became very much attached
to me.  On her husband dying quite suddenly, we were soon
married and came north, and she has since supported me in
luxury, until she became penniless.
  I went once to the home of my childhood and inquired for my
father, and learned that he had moved to the far west with his
family, and died. Now, Horace, I have one favor to ask;
write as much of this affair as you can, and send it to my wife;
she knows nothing of my early life; she thinks I was born and
bred a gentleman."
  This Horace promised to do.  And then remarked:
  "Some parts of your story sound strangely familiar to me.
What is your real name? You certainly can have no object in
concealing it now."
  "No," he replied, after a moment's hesitation; "my real name
is Dick Irving."
Horace seemed bewildered, and, placing both hands to his
head, he exclaimed: "Is this a dream ?" Then suddenly recollect-
ing, he added slowly: "But no, it is just as I feared."
 .  "What ?" cried Carleton, eagerly; "did you know my father?
 "Know  him !" repeated Horace, sadly; "he  was  my best
earthly friend; more than a father to me, and you have this night
taken his life !"
 Carleton looked wildly at him; then, with one great effort,
srang towards him.  The effort was too much, for he sank back
and instantly expired.
  The reader probably remembers under what circumstances
Dick left his father, who was very uneasy after he left the




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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