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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
356                    CHURCH REVIEW.

  "We left the Hall early this morning," continued Miss Cecil,
"to take a stroll, and not being acquainted with the different
roads, we lost our way, and have wandered about for some time.
Miss Duncan feels unable to proceed farther. Let me assist
you Maud," said she, going kindly towards her, "you are almost
exhausted."
  On reaching the door, Miss Duncan appeared to be quite faint.
Mrs. Leland and Sophie immediately came forward and rend-
ered her every assistance in their power.  Miss Cecil remained
at her side until she fell into a quiet slumber.
  She awoke feeling greatly refreshed, and declared herself
ready to proceed homeward. But this was not to be thought
of; so Hardie was dispatched to the Hall, with a note from Miss
Cecil stating where they were, and requesting that the carriage
be sent to convey them home. He was absent some time, being
detained on hid way there by a shower.
  Meanwhile it grew late, and Mrs. Leland prepared lunch for
her aristocratic visitors. It was plain and simple, but the best
her house afforded, and many were the apologies she made as
they seated themselves at the table. Master Arthur assured
her that no apology to him was necessary, as he could do justice
to any kind of food that day.
  The conversation naturally turned upon the state of the
country.
  Miss Cecil, Maud Duncan's governess, was an interesting,
amiable young lady, but Mrs. Leland found it very hard to make
her understand the extent of American prejudice. Not having
been brought up in the atmosphere of it, not a particle was
visible in her nature. 
  By way of illustration, Mrs. Leland mentioned several in-
stances wherein her own family had been concerned; such as
Sophie's rude expulsion from the high-school by the gentlemanly
principal; the insults her son received in searching for employ-
ment, after she had labored day and night, to give him an
education; and the treatment received in some of the so-called
christian churches.
  "How strange!" said Miss Cecil, "I have often heard that
the people of New England were the purest and most devoted
christians in the world."
  "So they are in their own estimation," replied Sophie, "but
it is all hidden from view under a bushel, excepting that part
that would crush a person into oblivion, on account of their
color; that shines brilliantly before the world."
 "How wicked!" said Miss Cecil, thoughtfully, "as if people
were to blame for their color!"
 "It must be the result of ignorance and low breeding," said
Miss Maud, who prided herself greatly on her noble ancestors.
 I sometimes look at it in that light," said Sophie, "and
think that it may die out as the world advances, and civilization
becomes more general."
  "How will it be in Heaven?" asked Master Arthur, gravely.
    




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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