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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
350                   CHURCH REVIEW.

  "Alice," said Mrs. Carleton, before she had time to reply,
"all this is useless. If we were rich, we could choose; but now
we must do as we can. The sooner we leave here the better.
I will speak to Maggie about her place, and if it suits me, I
think I shall take it. I long to go somewhere where I'm not
known."  And she hastily retired from the room.
  These great disappointments and trials preyed heavily upon
Mrs. Carleton, yet her fortitude never entirely forsook her.
Georgie was a great comfort to her now in planning and coun-
selling. Never before had the sweet girl been appreciated;
she seemed like a ray of sunshine in that dark and lonely
mansion.
  Alice was completely broken down by her misfortunes. She
seemed not to care whether she lived or died; she appeared
like a statue, possessed with the power of moving only. A
long and dangerous attack of illness followed this, and when 
she recovered, she seemed like another being, so humble and
submissive had she become.
  Mrs. Carleton declared that to see her favorite daughter thus
changed was the greatest of all her misfortunes.
  It took but a short time to complete arrangements with the ..
simple-hearted Maggie, and a few months found them settled
in their new home, all feeling greatly dissatisfied.
  Here they lived in extreme poverty for some time, when they
were driven to the village, Alice to seek employment in the 
factory, and her mother to open a boarding-house for factory
girls. Imagine that elegant southern lady doing the work for
a family of twenty boarders, assisted only by her invalid
daughter, and her accomplished daughter a factory girl!
Verily, time works wonders.


                      CHAPTER XI.

                     EXCITING NEWS.

  One chilly evening in March, several ladies and gentlemen had
congregated in Pilgrim Church, prior to the usual Thursday
evening service. They were engaged in an animated conver-
sation, when Mr. Willys Chapin entered. 
  "Good evening, Mr. Chapin," was the general exclamation;
"when did you return?"
  "I have only been home a few hours," returned Mr. Chapin.
"Have you heard the news?"
  "No, what is it?" exclaimed a dozen voices.
  "Oakland is sold," was the reply.
  "O, delightful!" cried Mrs. Marston; "then we shall have
some one to patronize. We miss the Carletons very much, they
were so stylish."
  "Who has purchased it?" asked several voices.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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