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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
312                   CHURCH REVIEW.

  During this time, Negro papers were  rapidly appearing
in the North.  "The Peoples' Journal," published by Rev.
Rufus L. Perry, at Brooklyn, N.Y., and a juvenile paper, also
published by him, (which in 1870 had a circulation of over
10,000) are among the most successful.  The progress being
made by those already in existence had arrived at such a point
as to encourage the undertaking of others.
  The well-known fact that the existence of Negro papers is
possessed with that unstableness so commonly termed a race
propensity, that it would be a task to attempt to enumerate them
with any degree of exactness at this juncture However, the
Negro periodicals in active circulation at this period numbered
about sixteen.
  In 1870, Dr. Rufus L. Perry began "The National Monitor,"
which is still living. "The Monitor," as is well known, is a
power in the land; it aims to reach and influence the thinkers
and leaders, white and black, as well as to inspire, lift up and
direct the South.  It has done its part loyally to secure what.
ever benefits, social and political, we, as a race, enjoy to-day
through that great change of public sentiment that has taken
place within the last twenty years.
 During the decade which began with 1870, there was a
steady increse in the number of Negro papers.
  We had commenced to demonstrate our power and ambition;
had begun to acquire wealth and property, and desired our-
selves felt as progressive citiens, capable of managing our
own journalistc enterprises; we more strongly saw the need of
race intercourse and mutual effort Our journals increased as
we became more conversant with our condition and our people
had become possessed of more education, culture and refine-
ment.  At the advent of the present decade, we find that there
were about twenty-six Negro journals in circulation. The be
ginning of the decade opens a period in the history of the race,
in which the mind of the Negro began to study more closely
his own condition as all Amnerican citizen; it was a period of
kuklukism, shot-gun policies, and all manner of political crimes
against the Negroes of the South.  It was a time when public
sentiment was strong against them; a time when public atten-
tion to thee crimes was to be demaned  by the Negroes of the
country; and not until the Negro press throughout the coun-
try had vigorously clamored against these political crimes, was
there any definite action taken on the part of the general and
State authorities to check them.
The Negro journals were being read; their power and influence
were being felt. New ones were springing up in the South, as
well as the North, to strengthen the force of those already in
existence.
 The advent of the , "Afro-American," at Cincinnati, Ohio;
"The Globe," and "The Gazette," at Cleveland, Ohio; "The
Ohio Falls Express," at Louisville,Kentucky; "The  Plain
      Dealer" at Detroit, Michigan; "The Gate City Press,"  at Kan-
 




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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