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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                     A RAY OF LIGHT.                    355

pressed a desire to visit the land of his birth, and spend a year
or two in travelling. He wished to know something more of
his mother's home; but his mother again objected, when Lord
Rossville (whose wife was a distant relative of Mrs. Ashley's),
interceded in his behalf, promising to travel with him, and to
see that he was provided with every comfort the country af-
forded. But Frederic's plan was to purchase a residence in the
northern states, provide every comfort, and have the family
occupy it during the time he and his friend were travelling. He
would then be nearer his mamma as he always affectionately
termed her.
  This plan met the approval of Lady Rossville, but it was some
time before Mrs. Ashley would consent to it. A residence
in the United States had no charms for her, but for Frederic's
sake she at last consented.
  After completing their arrangements, they sailed for Halifax,
and from there they proceeded to Montreal, where Frederic
dispatched an agent to the States to purchase a desirable resi-
dence for the family. Oakland being then the finest piece of
property offered for sale, he purchased it. Frederic went on,
completed arrangements, made everything as comfortable as
possible, and the following June the family arrived and took
possession of their new home, And strange enough it seemed
to them.



                       CHAPTER XII.

                       A RAY OF LIGHT

  Hardie was busily engaged in his garden one very warm
morning, when a tall gentlemanly boy, accompanied by two
ladies who looked warm and weary, leaned over the gate, and
inquired politely: "Does this road lead directly to Ashley Hall,
sir?"
  "No, sir," returned Hardie; "this is not the direct road."
  "How far is it to the Hall by this road?" asked the older of
the ladies.
  "About a mile and a half," was the reply.
  "What do you think of that, Master Arthur?" asked the
younger lady.  Then turning to her companion she continued,
 "Miss Cecil, I can never walk that distance in the heat. I am
ill now, and my head aches." 
  Miss Cecil looked thoughtful a moment, then turning  to
Hardie she asked: "Will you allow us to rest awhile under the
shade of your trees?"
  "Certainly," he replied, opening the gate politely.
           




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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