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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
362                   CHURCH REVIEW.

  "This prejudice seems to cost them considerable labor," said
Lady Rossville, addressing Sophie. "They must commence
early to teach it to their children."
  "Certainly," replied Sophie, apparently unconscious of roy-
alty. "They are always taught the inferiority of this unfortu-
nate race; and the word nigger, before they are their prayers."
  The gentlemen laughed heartily.
  "And this is the great American Republic! Boasted land of
liberty!" said Frederic, sarcastically. "Distinguished for its
free institutions of learning, its civilization and christianity!"
  Mr. Grey, after a moment's pause, remarked:  "I hope
there are some good people here."
  "I hope so," returned Frederic, thoughtfully.
  "I shall be delightled when it is time for us to return to Eng-
land," said Miss Duncan, as she rose from the table, excusing
herself by saying, "Miss Leland desires to walk in the garden."
  And the two withdrew.


                       CHAPTER XIII

        "IT IS MORE BLESSED TO GIVE THAN TO RECEIVE

"What a delightful place!" exclaimed Sophie, on entering
the garden. "I should never be weary enjoying its beauties! It
seems almost like what I have read of the Garden of Eden."
  "Do you think so?" remarked Miss Duncan, smiling at her
enthusiasm. "This is Frederic's place. I wish you could see
our place in England; it is far superior to this, The beauty of
Ashland, our country residence, is grand beyond description.
The view presented to the eye from the tower is one of the
loveliest in the country.  The park surrounding the mansion
contains more acres than this entire place. The grounds are
laid out with the most artistic skill, while the conservatory con-
tains choice plants from all climes, and the walks within this
glass structure are so broad that a coach and four can drive
about, easily."
  Maud Duncan was never so enthusiastic as when talking of
her English home, and, finding Sophie an eager listener, she
continued to pour forth its praises. After describing the much-
admired grotto, and the porter's ledge, in glowing terms, she
proceeded to give Sophie an idea of their own stately mansion.
  She dwelt long upon the magnificent grandeur of the interior,
The great hall, with its variegated marble floor, its ancient
paintings, and solid oak staircase. The spacious drawing-
rooms, with their richly-carved furniture, and costly tapestries.
The music-room, with its numerous choice paintings, miniatures
in porcelain, and splendid pier-glasses. The grand library,
with its rich Persian carpet, and Spanish mahogany book-cases.



			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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