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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                            VII.

        THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF NEGRO
                       JOURNALISM.

        BY JOHN T. MORRIS, M. A., Cleveland, O.

 The literary talent of a people is the measure of its national
worth. Nothing more clearly defines the stages of a people's
advancement than its circulating literature; nothing  more
vividly portrays the interest evinced therein than its period-
ical publications.
  The history of a people is founded on its literary achievements,
in the development of its political worth; and the ascendency of
the Negro race may be justly dated back to the beginning of its
literary ambition, its desire to effect national importance and a
tendency towards popular notoriety; or, in other words, to its
eagerness to become more strongly felt in the nation.
  When slavery had commenced to spread its dusky fangs over
the South, and the dull thud of the plantation hoe had com-
menced to broaden the fields of southern wealth and glory;
when the spirit of abolition was in its embryo, and its noble ad-
vocates had earnestly commenced to sow the seems from which
Negro liberty and citizenship subsequently sprang; when the
habitation of this beautiful country of ours had commenced to
move westward, and methods were being conceived for entering
into closer connections with the western borders; when science,
art and religion had commenced to develop into broader fields of
usefulness, and inventions had commenced to occupy the human
mind with a view to aiding in beautifying and developing our
country; during this phase of our national infancy, Negro jour-
nalism had its rise.
  At this historically important crisis, the Negro mind had been
strung to such a pitch as to force him into a position that de-
manded individual effort. He recognized his inability to gain
redress through the columns of the white press; he saw the
necessity of a more direct means of communication in the rae,
and foresaw the importance and indispensableness of the race's
enlightenment. He pictured to his mind the subsequent de-
velopment of Negro journalism and the power of its future
existence in the land, and consequently, in March, 1827, John
it. Russowarm and Rev. Samuel E. Cornish, after a season of
great embarrassment and discouragement, and during a time
of stern opposition to-abolition, began the publication of "The
Freedom's Journal," a paper devoted wholly to the interests
                             (309)




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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