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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
380                   CHURCH REVIEW.

ground be made to yield? In many instances, large fields of
poorly-developed cotton are left unharvested, til the cotton
falls out of the pod. Better farming is needed, then better
crops will be gathered with less labor. It is said by those
who are experienced in the work of cotton culture, that when
the highest cultivation is applied, and stock and crops properly
attended to, cotton farms can be made more profitable, by far,
than grain farms. We were presented with a walking-cane by
a gentleman named Stone, who has valuable property near Sel-
ma, Ala. This cane is a cotton-stalk. We had not seen one so
large as this before, and he used it in proof of the argument he
was making in favor of the high state of cultivation of which this
plant is susceptible. His property is worth $35,000, and a part
of it is within the incorporate limits of the city of Selma.
        *          *          *          *          *
  Selma, Ala.; Wilmington, N. C.; Onaha, Nebraska; Boston,
Mass; and Philadelphia, Penna, are the banner cities of the
Union in the work of supporting the A. M E. Church Review.
The subscription list is constantly increasing. We have recently
secured agents in fields hitherto not worked up, and we may
soon be able to say that the Review is read in every civilized
country on the globe.
  It is now the editor's agreeable duty, to extend his heartfelt
thanks to all the writers who have contributed to the columns
of the Review during the year.  The highest reward that any
person can wish,' when he sends his thoughts abroad, is to know
that his words have fallen in appreciative hearts, and have in-
structed and enriched them. Such generous efforts for the in-
tellectual and spiritual life of mankind cannot but be blessed
of Heaven. Not only are those blessed who receive the words
of wisdom, but the writers themselves are blessed by their own
earnest efforts to inspire and exalt the lives of others.
  We also heartily thank those friends, (and they are especially
the Bishops and the Ministers of the A. M. E Church,) who
have so kindly interested themselves to obtain new subscribers
for us, and to push forward the financial prosperity of the Re-
view. We are doubly indebted to the Bishops and the Minis-
ters, not only for their contributions of money, but also for their
literary contributions to the columns of the Review.
 Not only to the friends mentioned above, but to all the patrons
of the Review, we wish a Bright, Happy New Year.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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