OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
BROWSE

MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
                               V.

                 A SUMMER VACATION IN EUROPE.

                BY WILLIAM E. MATTHEWS, LL.B.,
                Broker and Banker, Wangton, D. C.

 "When a man of average intelligence returns home after having made a voyage
to a foreign land, he cannot help having formed a certain number of impressions,
and he has a right to communicate them to his friends. They are but impressions
-notes taken by the way-side."-Max O'Rell.

  An annual vacation is so well established in the social econ-
ony of the world as to need no vindication at my hands.  The
sole question is, where shall it be spent? I had been to most of
the summer resorts of this country-all of the more prominent
on the Atlantic Coast, from Fortress Monroe to Portland, Me.
-Cape May, Atlantic City, Long Branch, Coney Island, New-
port--I was not a stranger to the attractions of Saratoga or the
grandeur of Harper's Ferry; I had seen the rush and roar of
Niagara, and visited most of the cities and towns as far west as
Chicago, and had been once or twice to Canada
  Shall it be inland to the Pacific Coast, or a trip across the
Atlantic?
  Among the more obvious advantages of a sea voyage, aside
from the grand sights to be seen in the two-world centres, Lon-
don and Paris, are complete removal from occupation, perfect
rest and quiet, and a thorough change of scene. One lives on
deck, at sea, and passes at least fifteen out of the twenty-four
hours in the sunlight and in the open air. In this respect, it
has an advantage over the air of the open country, for good
authorities tell us that the best country air is apt to contain the
pollen of grasses and other plants, which, in many persons, ex-
cite hay fever and asthma  The air of the ship cabin may, of
course, be close, but the air of the open sea is doubtless the
purest that can be found anywhere. The presence in the sea air
of a large amount of ozone, as well as of particles of saline
matter, exercises a certain beneficial effect, especially in throat
and pulmonary affections. The exhilirating and tonic effect of
rapid motion through the air is as important as delightful. All
are agreed that the best results from a sea voyage are obtained
by the mentally overworked or depressed. The entire rest, the
constant exposure to the sea breeze, all combine to bring back
health, the power of sleeping soundly and digesting well, and
to restore a hearty activity to the general system.  There is also
a broadening education in foreign travel.  You see the world
from ..another standpoint, and come in contact with other races
                              (292)




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


HOME || CONTACT

http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Connection 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.