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PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
368                   CHURCH REVIEW.

press, potent for good or evil, had turned its batteries against
us, and those who dared to stand firm for the right were de-
nounced as "Machine politicians." The effect upon some mem-
bers of the Senate was so marked that when I was called to be
sworn in, my colleague, Mr. Alcorn, a man who owed his seat
in the Senate largely to my efforts, took refuge behind a news-
paper, to avoid extending to me the courtesy usual upon such
occasions. It was at this point that the grasp of your hand-
the first token of friendship that I had received--and your warm
words of welcome made me feel and know that in that august
body I had a friend. No one who has not undergone a similar
ordeal can understand and appreciate my feelings on that oc-
casion.
  Since then I have learned to know you, not only as the fore-
most man in American politics, but as the most practical, saga,
cious, truest friend of those who lately wore chains.
  Mrs. Bruce and I, in giving our firstborn, a boy, your name,
have entertained but one fear--that he may fall short of honor-
ing the great name he bears. We are made happy by the evi-
dence of your consent and your pleasure in our choice, by the
reception of your beautiful and valued gift as a token of it.
On behalf of the baby and Mrs. Bruce, I here wish to convey to
you, as far as these means permit, our gratitude and thanks.
Absence from home has prevented an earlier acknowledgment
                                I am, very truly yours,
                                              B. K. BRUCE
     Hon. Roscoe Conkling,
          Utica, N.Y.

          ARNETT GOVERNOR FOR AN HOUR.

  During the session of the General Assembly of 1886, the citi-
zens of Delaware, Ofio, invited the Governor, Lieutenant-Gov-
ernor, State officers and a number of the members of the As-
sembly to celebrate Lincoln's birthday, February 12th. A spe-
cial car was provided for the invited guests, but Gov. Foraker
took sick the day of the celebration, and was unable to go. The
rest of the company went, but the question was, "Who will de-
liver the speech of the Governor at the reception at the Opera
House?"  Prof. Nelson, of Wesleyan University, chairman of
the committee, informed Dr. Arnett, between Columbus and
Delaware, that it was the unanimous wish of the party that he
take the Governor's place at the Opera House. He accepted,
and delivered the speech, and the following poem was written
 to commemorate that event:
                         BY J. S. ELLIS.
      'Twas early in the spring of eighty-six,
      A time of a calm in politics.
      No heated campaigns to degrade or allure,
      And every Statesman in his seat secure.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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