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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
258                   CHURCH REVIEW.

the country schools of Canada could not give, and where her
parents subsequently removed, and now reside at Homewood
Cottage. She completed the classical scientific course in
with the degree of B.S., in a class of six.  One of her classmates
is the wife of Rev. Dr. B. F. Lee, ex-President of Wilberforce
and now (1890) editor of the "Christian Recorder while an-
other, Prof. S. T. Mitchell, A.M., has been elected President
of Wilberforce.
  Realizing that a great field of labor lay in the South, Miss
Brown, with true missionary spirit, left her pleasant home and
friends to devote herself to the noble work which she had chosen.
Her first school was on a plantation in South Carolina, where.
she endured the rough life as best she could, and taught a large
number of children gathered from  neighboring plantations.
She also taught a class of aged people, and by this means gave
to many the blessed privilege of reading the Bible. She next
took charge of a school on Sonora Plantation, in Mississippi,
where she found the effort to elevate the minds of the people
much hindered by the use of tobacco and whisky.
  But as she is an indefatigable worker, she accomplished
much, and at this place, as at all others where she is known, her
influence for the better was felt. Her plantation school had no
windows, but was well ventilated; too much so, in fact, for day
light could be seen from all sides, with no particular regularity,
and the rain beat in fiercely.  Not being successful in getting the
authorities to fix the building-shed we should have said--she
secured the willing service of two of her larger boys She
mounted one mule and the two boys another, and thus they rode
to :the gin-mill.  They got cotton seed, returned, mixed it with
earth, which formed a plastic mortar, and with her own hands
she pasted up the chinks, and ever after smiled at the unavailing
attacks of wind and weather.
  Her fame as an instructor spread, and her services were
secured as teacher at Yazoo City.  On account of the unsettled
state of affairs in 1874-'75, she was compelled to return North.
Thus, the South lost one of its most valuable missionaries, Miss
Brown next taught in Dayton, Ohio, for four years. Owing to
ill health, she gave up teaching. She was persuaded to travel
for her "Alma Mater," Wilberforce, and started on a lecturing
tour, concluding at Hampton School, Virgina, where she was
received: with very great welcome. At the "Soldier's Home,"
she was cordially greeted and kindly cared for by the sister of
Dr. Shipman. After taking a course in elocution, she traveled
again having much greater success, and receiving favorable
criticisms from the press.  For several years she has traveled
with "The Wilberforce Grand Concert Company," an organiza-
tion for the benefit of Wilberforce College. She has read before
hundreds of audiences, and tens of thousands of people, and has
received nothing but the highest praise from all.
 




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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