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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
               A RAY OF LIGHT.                    351

 "Do tell us all about it," cried another.
 "With pleasure," returned Mr. Chapin; "I learned from a
gentleman on the cars that the place had been sold, and the
purchaser was a wealthy colored gentleman."
 This was enough to produce intense excitement
 "Oh, horrible!" screamed the ladies.
  "It's a mistake, depend upon it," cried some of the gentlemen,
in disgust; "they never would sell it to such a person!"
  "My informant was a very reliable gentleman," said Mr.
Chapin; "and I think it is so. The agent toll me a short time
ago that he would sell it to any one that would pay the price."
  "He ought to be taken care of," said Mr. Leslie, roughly; "he
has ruined all the property in this vicinity. I will sell my place
the first chance I get."
  "If we had formed a company, and bought that place," he
marked Mr.Selling, the great cheat and speculator, "laid out
new streets, and sold building lots, we should have been saved
this mortification, and made something handsome beside"
  "I thought strongly of that at one time," replied Mr.Chapin,
"but my wife discouraged me. She said it was actually wicked
to ruin such a place."  
  "It's a fine place I know," said Mr. Leslie, earnestly "but I
had rather see it in ruins by the torch of the incendiary than
know that it will be the future home of any of dested
black race."       
  What a spirit for a christian to manifest towards inoffen-
sive brother! But how many christians are there in America
who do not possess this same spirit? yet, when they speak in a
prayer meeting, or address a sabbath, how differently
they appear. The conversation was here interrupted by the
entrance of the pastor.
  "Mr. Shirley, have you heard the news?" asked Mrs. Marston.
  "I have not," he replied. "Is Richmond ours?"
            
  "It's bad news," said Mrs.Isham, "and nearer home than
Richmond."
  "Ah!" said Mr. Shirley, looking from one to another;  "then
our army has been defeated!"
  "Worse than that," returned Mrs. Leslie "and nearer home
too. Oakland is sold!"
  "Do you consider that such bad news?" Mr. Shirley
in surprise. "Who are our neighbors to be?" 
  "Niggers," replied Mrs. Leslie, abruptly. 
  Mr. Shirley looked doubtful,while they laughed.
                           
  "We expect that's true, Mr. Shirley," said Mr. Leslie advanc-
ing; what do you think of it?"
   
  "It's a Shame!" replied!,meek man indigantly."As
dearly as I love the union cause, I would rather have heard of
the defeat of our army than heard this. It will ruin our property
 here."
  "I don't look at it, in that light," remarked Mr. Chapin his
usual decided manner. "None but a man of taste would buy                                                 
 




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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