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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
            LIFE OF MISS HALLIE QUINN BROWN.            259

                        CRITICISMS.

  Miss Brown may be thought to gesticulate too frequently in
some of her didactic selections; but right here is shown that she
discards the rigid rules of the books and follows nature, for she
possesses an ardent temperament, and nearly every sentence she
utters in private conversation is made emphatic or impressive
by a gesture or variation of the facial expression.
  Miss Brown possesses a voice of "wonderful magnetism and
great compass."  At times, she thrills by its intensity; at times,
it is mellow and soothing. She seems to have perfect control of
the muscles of her throat, and(can vary her voice as success-
fully as a mocking-bird.
  But we measure things largely by results. As a public reader,
Miss Brown delights, enthuses her audiences. In her humorous
selections, she often causes "wave after wave of laughter to
roll over her audience."
  In her pathetic pieces, she often moves her audience to tears.
  In her didactic recitations, she holds the listener spell-bound,
as she points out to him the shoals and quick-sands, or directs
him to paths of right and truth.
  But the public press speaks, and it has a right to be heard.
  The greatest compliment ever paid to Miss Brown, at least the
one she doubtless appreciates the most, was received under the
following circumstances: While at Appleton, Wis., she recited,
among other selections, "How He Saved St. Michael's." After
the concert, a lady came forward, requesting to be introduced to
the elocutionist.  The Rev. F. S. Stein then introduced to Miss
Brown Mrs. Dr. Stansbury, the author of "How He Saved St.
Michael's." Madam Stansbury grasped the hand of the elocu-
tionist, and exclaimed: "Miss Brown,- I have never heard that
piece so rendered before." This, notwithstanding a famous reader
a few weeks before had given the same selection there, and
advertised by announcing that she would render Mrs. Stans-
bury's famous poem. Miss Brown was confused. She did not
even know the lady lived in the State, and did not dream of her
presence in the house; hence she was taken completely by sur-
prise, nor would she have attempted to give it had she heard of
the presence of the authoress.  The compliment was all the more
appreciated, because every elocutionist who visits that section
renders "St. Michael's."


                  A CASKET OF LAURELS.
      WON BY MISS HALLIE QUINN BROWN,OF WILBERFORCE.

  Miss H. Q. Brown, the elocutionist, ranks as one of the finest
in the country."Daily News," Urbana, O.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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