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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
          WHO SHALL SUCCEED MR. GRADY?                  275

ceive of a Northern man answering at Atlanta in spirit directly
contrary to his speech at the house of Garrison, Phillips, Sum-
ner and Higginson.  The Northern press was appalled by his
boldness, and the eulogy which was heaped upon his bier was a
worthy tribute to the man's achievement. The gush and twad-
dle of Northern editors even to the emasculated "New York
Weekly," which called him a martyr to the South--demonstrate
that Northern men are not so thoroughly imbued with their
convictions as are Southern men.
  He must be essentially a Southern man, suckled at a black
breast, reared with black boys, smarting under his injustice to
his own father's colored children, thoroughly cognizant of the
human relations between blacks and whites, which the North
knows little, or absolutely nothing, about  He must know the
Negro as only a Southern man knows him.
  I feel that I have merely taken a practical view of the matter,
when I have indicated these qualifications, as imperatively
required by existing conditions. They are unfavorable to our
cause; but they are also necessary to the keeping alive of the
issue before the country. There is one other qualification,
however, that we may hope for in Mr. Grady's successor.
He should be truthful.  Mr. Grady was not so.  Bias, preju-
dice, demagogy or short-sightedness may account for Mr.
Grady's misrepresentation; but he was untruthful to a most fla-
grant degree.  To call a man a liar is the argument of the gutter
or the street-corner; but what else can we do when he pro-
fesses superior knowledge of his subject, and utters what are to
us palpable falsehoods, delivered for the purpose of hood-
winking Northern whites?
  A Christian white man, though he be imbued with every
Southern peculiarity, will grant us fair play. We ask simply
what he freely grants to foreign whites, a fair start and a clear
field. To-day, the Negro is far ahead of his opportunities.  In
every position of trust or responsibility to which he has been re-
luctantly admitted, he has surprised even his friends. If in fair
competition a Negro wins a place under the Civil Service Com-
mission, we can hope that Mr. Grady's successor will not deny
him fair play, or applaud insult to the Federal officer who grants
it. We hope for a new apostle of the South who shall recognize
achievement by a black, even if his prejudice prevent him from
encouraging it. We hope for a patriotic Christian, a student
who sees the far-reaching character of this question, and who, at
least, will not, by false statements, prejudice our friends against
us.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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