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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
310                   CHURCH REVIEW.

of the down-trodden race, and a live advocate of abolition.
The Journal finally emerged into "The Rights of All," Rus-
sowarm afterwards assuming the sole control of it. Russowarm,
at that time, was known as an able and outspoken editor; a
strong defender of Negro freedom and citizenship. "The Rights
of All" was conducted under great opposing influences. It was,
at that time, something new, a phenomenon to the slave-loving
country. It was "an infringement" upon the rights of white
humanity, and a fierce blow to white domination. It was a
strong defender of the race.
  After the country had been worked up to a point of envious
acquiescence, and this fierce opposition had partially subsided,
"The Weekly Advocate" made its surprising appearance, which,
under the strong pressure of this still existing prejudice, lived
only six months.  "The Advocate" began its existence in 1837,
in New York city, with P. A. Bell as editor and proprietor.
  Having fallen under the storm of pro-slavery, it was imme-
diately supplemented by "The Colored American," with Bell as
proprietor, and Rev. S.E.Cornish, editor. Mr. Cornish was an
old and indefatigable journalist, having been connected with
the first paper, "The Freedom's Journal," and was an able
wielder of the pen. The paper was a power in the land. The
Rev. Chas. B. Ray was its: associate editor, and finally became
sole editor and proprietor. This valuable sheet ceased its ex-
itence in 1842, having brightened the way for future journal.
istic developments. About cotemporaneously with "The Col-
ored American," in 1837 or 1839, Samuel Ruggles began the
publication of "The Mirror of Liberty" in New York city, after-
wards the "Genius of Freedom,'" somewhat, secular in its pur-
port, yet in a great degree devoted to the general interests of
the race. "The Colored American" ran longer than Ruggles's
paper, owing to Mr. Ray having taken hold when Bell ceased
his connection therewith. Ruggles was a man of profound in-
tellect, and was respected by all as an able and inconquerable
editor.
  The beginning of the year 1847 marks the establishment of
"The North Star," at Rochester, N.Y., by Frederick Douglass,
whose boldness and superior journalistic ability won for it a
world-renowned reputation. "The  North  Star" eventually
emerged into "The Frederick Douglass Paper."  During the
ame period, "The National Watchman" sprang into existence
at Troy, N.Y., ably conducted by Mr. G. Allen and Henry High-
land Garnett, who was, in later years, appointed Minitser to
Liberia  This was a time when public sentiment had com-
menced to look with favor upon the abolition of slavery, and
race effort was being aided by white abolitionists of the coun-
try to describe the dreadful evils of slavery. The co-existene
of "The North Star" and "The National Watchman" doubled the
combative strength in the race struggle. Their influence began
to spread, paving the way for future work. As the feeling in
favor abolition began to spread, the influence of the Negro




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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