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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3
			
 320                  CHURCH REVIEW.

drink, tobacco-chewing, cigar-smoking and snuff-using, which
will result in the overthrow of his physical, moral, financial and
intellectual strength-blotting out those principles of right
which should lead them to be true to themselves and which
will bring them to disgrace and shame. Such enemies will des-
troy the peace and happiness of any man who yields to these
temptations. It was said by a very eminent writer that what is
bred in the brain will never come out of the flesh in one genera-
tion. The only way man can secure himself from these bad
habits, is to throw a hedge about himself by watching and shun-
ning all appearances of evil  This should be done in the bloom
of life. The wise man, Solomon, said "Remember now thy Cre-
ator, in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor
the years draw nigh when thou shalt say I have no pleasure in
them." Time never turns backward; it keeps its course. Sad-
ness and regret will be in vain after golden opportunities have
passed.
  To be true to ourselves, we must strive to keep in the chan-
nel of human  welfare. Alexander the Great was a man  of
much fame in his day, on account of his soldierly and warlike
power. He could have been a greater man than he was if he
had not neglected the important duty of being true to him-
self. When we readl of how he thirsted for human blood,
and how he destroyed his life by indulging in strong drink, it
is a plain fact that he was not true to himself, with all his
greatness.
  The influence which we exert among our fellow-men has its
effect either for good or bad. A bad influence is a curse to
others, as well as to ourselves, and should be shunned, as a
poisonous reptile in our pathway.  We need not be ignorant
of this fact, for we have too great a light, which is said to be a
medium "through which objects are discerned"  Another dis-
advantage to the prosperity of humanity is dishonesty. Any
man who seeks to swindle his fellow-man, and rob him, because
it lies in his power to do so, is a thief in the first degree.
  There are so many ways the unjust man selects to take
advantage of others. Bush-whacking, house-breaking, char-
acter-slandering, and ballot-box stuffing are some of the
evil ways men destroy each other. They should remember the
end is not here  Those who are guilty of such dishonesty will
suffer the consequence& Dr. Wayland says: "Wherever a law is
violated, a sequence is sure to follow." The Apostle Paul
said in one of his letters he wrote to the Galatians: "For what-
soever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that
soweth to the flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he
that soweth to the spirit shall of the spirit reap life everlast-
ing." We get warning from many sources, teaching men to be
true to themselves.
 When we think of the life of Joseph, how he was treated by
his brothers, simply because he had gained the affection of his
father in his youth, by his goodness and obedience, and how he




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Serial Collection

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 6, Num. 3

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Date:  01/1890


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