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Ohio Annual Conference, Reports and Resolutions Adopted
			
             REPORTS AND RESOLUTIONS                   13
                The Negro in the War

  We are gratified to know that among the forces of the
country on the battlefield of Europe are to be found thous-
ands of our own race variety. The American Negro is fac-
ing the fray. He was among the first to respond to the
call to arms, among the first to cross the ocean, among the
first to land in France, among the first to meet the baptism
of fire, among the first to die in defense of American honor,
among the first to win the war cross of France for sublime
bravery in action, among the first to gain the military
recognition of England as being in any capacity every inch
a soldier. The American Negro is at the Flanders battle
front, covering himself with laurel wreaths which shall be
fadeless in the annals of the nations. He is "over there"
never to retire until he shall move in triumph with the con-
quering legions, singing the victor's song, and this fact is
one of the most important, the most inspiring, the most
emphatic of loyalty in this report on the State of the Coun-
try.
              The President and Mob Law

  Among other issues indicating noteworthy moral change
is a recent explicit published statement of the President of
the United States condemning the crime of lynching and
calling upon the nation to arise and stamp it out.  We re-
gret to say that mob law as it is generally known, has be-
come, as it were, an accepted rule in American civilization,
and it is much to be deplored that the voice of federal de-
nunciation has been so long to be heard against it. It is
admitted that when Robert Praeger, a white man of pro-
German proclivity, was lynched by a mob in this country,
Germany laughed us to scorn in our professed horror at
her war outrages, and accused us of being no better
ourselves even in times of peace, and that this taunt of
our foe evoked the President's warning.  What effect this




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Ohio Annual Conference, Reports and Resolutions Adopted


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