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Colored American Republican Text Book
			
                               38

lallel.   President Grant did not send any troops into the South
to suppress Ku-Klux-Klan outrages--they were there already--
and not been recalled, after the termination of the civil war, and
he simply ordered them from place to place in the several States
where they were located, to protect voters at the polls and to
assist United States civil officials in serving process.  More than
this; after numerous Ku-Klux had been arrested and convicted,
at great expense, he pardoned nearly all of them, before the ex-
piration of their several terms.
   The case of ex--President Cleveland sending United States
troops to protect the mails, during the strike  at Chicago is often
referred to.  This is not a similar case for several reasons.
   First, there was no dispute on the part of President Cleve-
land's law advisers as to his legal right to send those troops to
Chicago, to protect the mails.
   Second, the disorder at Chicago continued for a week or more,
and  Mr. Cleveland had time to send troops there.  In the case
at Lake City, S. C., no one save the bloody lynchers knew that
Baker and his family were going to be assassinated; and after it
was done, it was too late to send troops.   All that was left to be
done was to detect the assassins and prosecute them, according to
law.  This the President has done and is doing.  He even has
employed extra able counsel to assist the prosecuting attorney at
Charleston.

   Take the terrible affair at Wilmington, N. C.  The governor
of North Carolina is a Republican, and was authorized to call on
the President for troops, in an emergency.    The governor did
not call for troops--the election was ended--no one was killed.
Then, like a clap of thunder out of a cloudless sky, the mob as-
sailed and killed a lot of helpless colored people.  Not even the
colored people at Wilmington knew that this foul deed would
be perpetrated.  The President could not foresee what even
they could not tell, even if he had possessed the legal power and
the means had been appropriated by Congress to send troops
there.
   No one could know that those six men "lynched" at Newman,




			
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Colored American Republican Text Book


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