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Budget Containing the Status of Methodism at the Second Ecumenical Conference of Methodism
			
218     STATUS OF  METHODISM  AND CHRISTIANITY.

versed on any topic with which he was acquainted his words seemed
to have been engraved on the heart with a pen of fire.  One might
listen for hours with wraped attention to his conversation and still be
charmed by the richness of his voice and fascinated by the variety of
his anecdotes.
     He had great power in song, and as soon as his sermons were
ended you could always hear his melodious voice lifted in song, either
in praise to God or invitation to sinners, and how they would flock to
the anxious seat.
     His piety was deep and fervent and his morals were pure and
untarnished and his zeal for the cause of the master was unbounded.
Even at that early day he laid hold of the great reforms with a vigor
that would do credit to any age.  He seemed to see with a prophetic
eye the evils which would assail the colored people from intemperance
and vice, and at every opportunity would lift a warning voice to both
young and old.  The Anti-slavery cause enlisted his most profound
sympathy.    He frequently expressed his opinion to his friends that
slavery would be abolished at a very early period.   He had unwaver-
ing faith in God and not a doubt troubled his mind on the subject.
He loved African Methodism for the religious freedom and indepen-
dence it afforded.  He often said that their deliberations were the sur-
est methods of learning colored men the power of self government.
When he first entered their conferences he was charmed with their
discussions and the freedom with which they approached their leaders,
and he ever afterward entered heart and soul into the work.  The inci-
dents of his eventful life were thrilling and wonderful.  In traveling
through the mountainous regions of West Virginia, where there were
only bridle paths, and these often passed over steep and precipitous
places where it was dangerous for a man to attempt to walk.    He said
that often there would be only a step between him and death, for with
one misstep of his horse he would have been dashed over ruinous
cliffs to be crushed by the rocks below.  At another time he was over-
taken by night in one of the lonely mountain passes.    He saw a small
light gleaming at a distance; he followed it and came to a small cabin.
When admitted he found a number of dreadful looking men inside,
some lying apparently asleep, others were in council. They were
dressed in red hunting shirts and armed with knives and pistols in




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Budget Containing the Status of Methodism at the Second Ecumenical Conference of Methodism


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