OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206  207  208  209  210  211  212  213  214  215  216  217  218  219  220  221  222  223  224  225  226  227  228  229  230  231  232  233  234  235  236  237  238  239  240  241  242  243  244  245  246  247  248  249  250  251 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Budget Containing the Status of Methodism at the Second Ecumenical Conference of Methodism
			
             STATUS OF METHODISM AND CHRISTIANITY.             219

their belts. One fierce one asked him if he had any money which he
demanded to be surrendered immediately or he would take his life.
He gave all he had and prayed earnestly for the morning. They took
it and seemed to relent.  Before morning they all left after taking an
oath from him that he would not divulge their hiding place.  This
fearless servant of God passed through many more dangers and oppo-
sitions till God enlarged his borders in a free State and he performed
his arduous work until called suddenly to his reward.
                                             S. J. W. EARLY.
                                                   NASHVLLE, TENN.

                      SIGNIFICANT FACTS.
     Christian Advocate, New  York. Dec. 17, 1891     Thinking it
might be of interest to some of your readers to know the relative
standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church in comparison with the
other leading Protestant Churches, I send you the following table. It
gives the number of communicants for the year 1890 in each of the five
principal English-speaking churches in each of the following-named
States and in the Territories of the United States. The list includes
all the States except those which before the war were slave States.
The latter we have omitted from the fact that there are other denomi-
nations of Christians with which comparisons ought to be made when
the statistics of those States are considered. We will send them in
the near future. The statistics of the Methodist Episcopal Church
are taken from the General Minutes of 1890, and include both full mem
bers and probationers.  While they are not absolutely correct they
are as near so as they can be made from the Minutes. In a few
instances circuits have appointments in two States, no division of
members between the different States being made in the Minutes.
In such cases the State having within its border the town or locality
from which the circuit is named gets the credit of the membership.
These instances are, however, few in number, and the statistics given
may be accepted as substantially correct.




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Budget Containing the Status of Methodism at the Second Ecumenical Conference of Methodism


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.