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"The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A Social Study (1830-1900)." Bulletin of the Bureau of Labor
			
                   THE NEGROES OF XENIA, OHIO.                    1025

According to the other classification used in the Farmville and Sandy
Springs studies the working population over 10 years of age may be
divided as follows: Those working on their own account, 85; the
laboring class, 417; house service, 98; day service, 188; at home,
unoccupied, and dependent, 634; professional and clerical, 46; not
reported, 37.
  The following table shows the perecentage of Negroes of Xenia
engaged in certain classes of gainful occupations, in comparison with
the percentage of Negroes of Farmville and of Sandy Spring, and of
the total population of the United States engaged in the same classes
of occupations:
PER CENT OF NEGROES OF XENIA, OF FARMVILLE, OF SANDY SPRING, AND OF THE
 TOTAL POPUATION OF THE UNITED STATES AT WORK ENGAGED IN EACH CLASS OF
 GAINFUIL OCCUPATIONS.
[The figures for Xenia, Farmville, and Sandy Spring are from schedules; those for the United States
                      are from the censuses of 1890 and 1900.]

{Table}

  Of the entire population over 10 years of age 834, or 55.42 per cent,
are engaged in gainful occupations; of the males 537 out of 701, or
76.60 per cent, and of the females 297 out of 804, or 36.94 per cent.
  THE PROFESSIONS. --There are 2 Negro physicians in Xenia, and they
have most of the practice among Negroes in the city and vicinity.
Each is a home owner, is intelligent, and seems to be abreast with the
times in his profession.  They have practiced in Xenia 27 years and 7
years, respectively, and both of them enjoy the respect and confidence
of the community at large.  Their practice amounts to about $2,500
per year for one and $1,000 for the other. There is now no regular
lawyer in Xenia, but there is one law student. The one Negro lawyer
who formerly lived in Xenia was appointed by President McKinley as
Jnited States consul-general to Santo Domingo, which position he still
holds. He is 53 years of age, was born of free parents in Fayette
County, and educated at Wilberforce University. He was admitted
to the bar in 1872 and served several terms as city clerk for the city of
Xenia.  All except one of the teachers of the public schools usually
attended by Negroes are Negroes. These received their training in the
Xenia high school and at Wilberforce University chiefly. Their sal-
aries range from $40 per month to $1,200 per year.  The principal of




			
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"The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A Social Study (1830-1900)." Bulletin of the Bureau of Labor

R.

Issue Number:  48


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