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Miscellaneous Department
			
                     MISCELLANEOUS.                                                   

               THE RACE QUESTION IN AFRICA.
                                 L
 No less a writer than Frank G. Carpenter is authority for the state-
ment that the race question in the English African Colonies is be,
coming a matter of serious concern.
 The Kaffirs are increasing in intelligence and are beginning to feel
the injustices heaped upon them in the poor provisions made for their
education; in the miserable wages paid them in some sections--about
3 cents a day; in the enormous hut and other taxes laid upon them
for which no benefits are returned; in being excluded from walking
on the sidewalks. Says Mr. Carpenter, "At present the black man here
has no opportunity to get a college education. He is not allowed to
go into the universities of South Africa, and as a rule the people
would rather keep him uneducated.
  They look upon the natives as their God-created hewers of wood
and drawers of water, and they want them  to continue so.         They
would rather that they should not own real estate nor go into
business. The mechanics and foreman, among the whites would rather
not have the blacks learn trades, and they desire to keep the labor
of the two races distinct.
  In Kimberly and Johannesburg the natives are paid about $1 a
day, but in Uganda, in British East Africa and German East Africa
the pay is only 3 cents a day and the whites claim it is wrong to pay
more, as the native will not work for better wages. One of these
employers of labor in Nyassaland claimed that it is spoiling the
native since the law no longer allows the white man to whip the
native laborer! Think of that and then cease to wonder why the
race problem in Africa is beginning to loom large.
  But that's not all. Out of the pittance paid the natives, they are
required to pay six shillings or $1.50 a year as a road tax, or else give
one month work in lieu. One month out of a year to be given for the
public benefit.  There is a hut tax, a dog tax and a wife tax in South
Africa, none of the benefits of which go to the native.
  When Mr. Carpenter asked the American foreman of an African
                           (421)




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 25, Num. 4

Miscellaneous Department

Volume:  25
Issue Number:  04
Page Number:  421
Date:  04/1909


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