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Women's Department
			
                         WOMEN.                                 


                       VOTES FOR WOMEN.

  For a long time women teachers in New York schools have urged that
for doing the same work as men, they should receive the same pay. The
salary commission has held that men teachers contribute "masculinity,
man's viewpoint of life, power, elements of strength, of executive force,
positive convictions, practical sense, breadth of vision and sound judgment,
manly influence, man's interest in mechanical contrivances and man's
duties as a citizen."
  We don't remember whether the commission pointed out that at least half
the pupils are girls, and women teachers contribute femininity, woman's
viewpoint of life, power, elements of strength, womanly influence, and so
on. If one thinks lack of positive convictions characterizes the woman
teacher let him get her to talking about equal pay with men for doing
equal work. Usually she will display convictions of the most positive
nature--as well as the practical sense, breadth of vision and sound judgment
that enable her to pursue those convictions in the most effective manner
open to her; but the concluding disadvantage she has to confess. She
cannot contribute "man's duties as a citizen." Men will not let her. When
men withhold the ballot from women, and allege that as a ground for with-
holding higher pay, it is no wonder women say the only reason they can-
not get higher pay is because they cannot vote and the only reason they
cannot vote is because they cannot get higher pay.-Sat. Eve. Post.

        THE SITUATION IN COLORED COMMUNITIES.
   (The following extract from the Report of the Vice Commission of Chicago
should be of interest to the women of our race.)
  "The history of the social evil in Chicago is intimately connected with
the colored population.    Invariably the larger vice districts have  been
created within or near the settlements of  colored  people.      In the past
history of the city, nearly every time a new vice district has been created
down town or on the South Side, the colored families were in the district,
moving in just ahead of the prostitutes. The situation along State street
from 16th street south is an illustration.
                          (612)




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 28, Num. 2

Women's Department

Volume:  28
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  612
Date:  10/1911


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