OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
1 
Item Description Next Next
Africa and the Beginning of Christian Latin Literature
			
             THE ADORATION OF THE MAGI.                99

pression of man's reverence for the Creator: of appreciation of
that which He has made. In short, art, true art, is worship.
Art, then, which purposely belies history, which basely or
baselessly perverts tradition, which even by implication denies
a common Fatherhood and a common Brotherhood--an equal-
ity of kinship in all mankind as taught by every prophet and
apostle, and confirmed by His Son-so-called art which thus-
wise impudently caricatures God's revelation of Himself in
Nature, no matter how harmonious the grouping, how accu-
rate the drawing, how brilliant the coloring, or how clever the
modeling, cannot permanently endure to the soul-satisfying
of men. Eventually, it will be discredited, rejected and cast
out. Such a fate is not in store for the 'Howard Mabuse' or
for other works of the 'masters,' old and  new,  who       have
wrought with purely 'heartfelt seriousness and high endeavor.
    Alexandria, Va., July, 1912.


                 ----------------


        AFRICA AND THE BEGINNINGS OF CHRISTIAN
                 LATIN LITERATURE.
     Rev. Professor Benjamin B. Warfield, D.D., LL.D.,
                  Princeton, N.J.

               IN  Africa rather than in Rome  the roots of
               Latin Christianity are actually  set.  It is
               from African soil, enriched by African intel-
               lect, watered by African blood, that the tree
               of Western Christianity has grown up until
               it has become a resting place for all the na-
tions of the earth.  If we abjure speculation upon what might
have been on this or that supposition, and give attention
purely to what actually has been and is, we must needs con-
fess that there is a true sense in which North Africa is the
mother of us all. Christianity is what it is to-day, in all its
fruitful branches at least, because of what North Africa was a
millennium and a half ago, and because of what was done and
thought and felt there.  The very language in which it still




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
Item Description Next Next

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 29, Num. 2

Africa and the Beginning of Christian Latin Literature

B.

Volume:  29
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  99
Date:  10/1912


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.