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Free Soil and the Progressive Convention-The Colored Man Then and Now
			
        FREE SOIL AND PROGRESSIVE CONVENTION              241

of their ambition to lend a helping hand to those who are now just
beginners, so that in the near future the black man will have
acquired all the accomplishments of his white brother.
    It is needless to say that in the next fifty years our race will
have produced many other eminent men like Richard Allen, Fred-
erick Douglass, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Booker T. Washington and
Reverdy Ransom, Sr.
    Scattered throughout the wide territory of the forty-eight
United States are situated institutions for the education of the
Negro boy and girl, namely, Wilberforce University in Ohio,
Hampton Institute in Virginia, Shaw in North Carolina, and Tuske-
gee in Alabama, these all being erected since the year 1863. It is in
these schools and colleges that the boys and girls of today are taught
to be the men and women of tomorrow, who will raise high the ban-
ner for Negro rights and privileges.
    To our native land across the sea missionaries are daily being
sent to convert the savage to the cause of religion and education.
And it should be the earnest prayer of all that it be not far distant
when they, too, will realize what Abraham Lincoln has done for the
colored race. Then
        "Onward, Christian soldiers, marching as to war,
        With the cross of Jesus going on before."

    This paper is the only response to our invitation printed in the
October Review for articles on "Fifty Years of Freedom." Miss Mackey
is only 14 years old. She lives in New York city.--Editor.


                    -----------------------------


           THE FREE SOIL AND THE PROGRESSIVE CONVEN-
              TION-THE COLORED MAN THEN AND NOW

                   By George W. Forbes, M. A.

           NOW that the campaign for 1912 is over and Prof.
           Wilson has reached office on the crest of an un-
           precedented political tidal wave, it may  be well
           to pause, and like Webster's mariner, see how
           far the elements have driven us from our true
           course.  One of the most peculiar features about
           the battle of 1912 was its close similarity to that
           of 1848. There was then a three-cornered fight
among Democrats, Whigs, and Free Soilers, with the last drawing
in the end just enough votes from Democrats to elect the Whig
President. And more remarkable still, the Free Soil party, which




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 29, Num. 3

Free Soil and the Progressive Convention-The Colored Man Then and Now

W.

Volume:  29
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  241
Date:  01/1913


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