OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Editorials
			
 268                 THE  A. M. E. REVIEW

canning industry in New York, and the employment of chil-
dren of tender years in factories. mills and other manu-
facturing plants, have awakened the public conscience and
aroused public sentiment. Some of this public condemnation
and resentment has found vent in rhyme.
     George L. Knapp (N. Y. World), in the "Two Litanies,"
sings in fine sarcasm:

               Softly rose the litany:
               "Suffer them to come to me;
               These my Father's chosen be,
                 All the little children."
               Where the faithful knelt in prayer,
               To their Father singing, there
               Trembled on the scented air
                 Voices of the children.

               Where the wheels of traffic groaned,
               Men of Mammon, high enthroned,
               Other litany intoned
                 For the little children;
               Fiercely swelling, loud and strong,
               Raucous rang their savage song,
               Where the chaffering traders throng:
                 "Suffer, little children!"

               Crooked back and stunted brain,
               Heart of hate and brow of pain,
               Youth worked out for Mammon's gain-
                 "Suffer, little children!"
               Racking cough and aching limb,
               Ears grown dull and eyes worn dim-
               This is how they come to Him
                 Who called the little children.

                 Still the organ's droning voice
               Bids good Christian men rejoice;
               Still they tell the Saviour's choice:
                 "Come, ye little children."
               Still in market, mine and mill
               Mammon works his wanton will,
               Wasting youth's fair garden still,
                 Torturing the children.

     This growing sensitiveness of the public conscience in
regard to child labor is a sign of progress. The place for the
child is in the bright school room, and not in the factory, or
elsewhere, bound to some task unsuited to its strength and
to its years. The American child, except in cases of dire




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 29, Num. 3

Editorials

Volume:  29
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  260
Date:  01/1913


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.