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Editorials
			
270                THE A. M. E. REVIEW

    If the white children of the North, East and West and
largely of the South, including the child of the immigrant,
require from nine to ten months' schooling each year for the
first eight years after they come of school age, then cer-
tainly the black children cannot be properly equipped for
citizenship nor compete successfully with these, on from
three to six months' schooling for four or five months in a
year. The terms in which a man thinks will largely deter-
mine his action. We must come to think more in the terms
of the welfare of childhood. How is it environed, morally and
socially, in the home and in the community, and what are its
educational advantages? Is it allowed to be frequently
absent from school for trivial causes? Or is it sold bodily
to some employer for a few cheap dollars, and thus despoiled
and robbed beyond repair of that equipment for life which
is its due?
     We have spoken of the black child because he is ever
in our midst as our peculiar care, and if we will dedicate
ourselves to his proper development, his tread will mingle
with that of the mightiest of the millions of those who go
forth daily to build here a righteous, an enlightened, a
great and prosperous nation.


                  --------------------

                       REVIVALS

     While the Church may be working in harmony, edified
by the pastor's sermons, comforted by his ministrations
and contribute sufficient money to make it financially pros-
perous, every earnest pastor feels that unless there are con-
verts he has failed at the most vital point. A wife who is
childless or barren is none the less a wife because of this,
but when children come into the home they set their seal
upon marriage and become a crown upon the head of wife-
hood; so the minister who goes through the years without
souls being converted under his ministry may be none the
less a minister, but when souls are converted under his




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 29, Num. 3

Editorials

Volume:  29
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  260
Date:  01/1913


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