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Editorials
			
                 EDITORIAL                      275

                    BLEASE

    We have survived the wild ravings of Tillman, the
vulgar vituperation of Vardiman and Jeff Davis and the
cold-blooded and calculating antagonism of Hoke Smith, and
we shall easily withstand the wicked and intemperate as-
saults of Governor Pearl Blease, of South Carolina.
    The case of Blease is chiefly of value as a study of
American political and social conditions. The majority of
the citizens of the state of which he is governor are Negroes,
yet with severe brutality of speech he boldly and openly de-
clares that he would repudiate his oath of office and give
the mob free rein to lynch any Negro accused of certain
crimes.
    When asked whether he had not taken an oath to up-
hold the laws and Constitution of his State, and protect
Negroes as well as white men, this was his defiant answer:
    "I will answer that question, and I hope the newspaper
men will get it right, for in my campaign in South Carolina
they found that I am a fighter and a cold-blooded fighter.
When the Constitution steps between me and the defense of
the white women of my State, I will resign my commission
and tear it up and throw it to the breezes. I have hereto-
fore said 'to hell with the Constitution!'"
    Why does Governor Blease, without fear of damage to
his political fortunes, thus offer the Negroes of his State
the menace of anarchy for the supremacy of the Constitu-
tion, courts and juries?
    It is because the Negroes of South Carolina have lost,
or been shorn of political power. They are as powerless to
decree his political death as he is powerful to refuse pro-
tection to their lives. But it is not the Negroes who are
most injured or will be the greatest sufferers from such an
unjustifiable position as he assumes. Christianity, morality,
law and civilization itself are the real victims of his as-
sault. Governor Blease has proven himself to be a more
dangerous enemy of society than the worthless wretch he
would destroy, for he has raped the Constitution, outraged
Law, assailed the Courts, and assaulted the Chastity of
Justice.




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 29, Num. 3

Editorials

Volume:  29
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  260
Date:  01/1913


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