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Summer Vacation in Europe
			
                               V.

                 A SUMMER VACATION IN EUROPE.

                BY WILLIAM E. MATTHEWS, LL.B.,
                Broker and Banker, Wangton, D. C.

 "When a man of average intelligence returns home after having made a voyage
to a foreign land, he cannot help having formed a certain number of impressions,
and he has a right to communicate them to his friends. They are but impressions
-notes taken by the way-side."-Max O'Rell.

  An annual vacation is so well established in the social econ-
ony of the world as to need no vindication at my hands.  The
sole question is, where shall it be spent? I had been to most of
the summer resorts of this country-all of the more prominent
on the Atlantic Coast, from Fortress Monroe to Portland, Me.
-Cape May, Atlantic City, Long Branch, Coney Island, New-
port--I was not a stranger to the attractions of Saratoga or the
grandeur of Harper's Ferry; I had seen the rush and roar of
Niagara, and visited most of the cities and towns as far west as
Chicago, and had been once or twice to Canada
  Shall it be inland to the Pacific Coast, or a trip across the
Atlantic?
  Among the more obvious advantages of a sea voyage, aside
from the grand sights to be seen in the two-world centres, Lon-
don and Paris, are complete removal from occupation, perfect
rest and quiet, and a thorough change of scene. One lives on
deck, at sea, and passes at least fifteen out of the twenty-four
hours in the sunlight and in the open air. In this respect, it
has an advantage over the air of the open country, for good
authorities tell us that the best country air is apt to contain the
pollen of grasses and other plants, which, in many persons, ex-
cite hay fever and asthma  The air of the ship cabin may, of
course, be close, but the air of the open sea is doubtless the
purest that can be found anywhere. The presence in the sea air
of a large amount of ozone, as well as of particles of saline
matter, exercises a certain beneficial effect, especially in throat
and pulmonary affections. The exhilirating and tonic effect of
rapid motion through the air is as important as delightful. All
are agreed that the best results from a sea voyage are obtained
by the mentally overworked or depressed. The entire rest, the
constant exposure to the sea breeze, all combine to bring back
health, the power of sleeping soundly and digesting well, and
to restore a hearty activity to the general system.  There is also
a broadening education in foreign travel.  You see the world
from ..another standpoint, and come in contact with other races
                              (292)




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 06, Num. 3

Summer Vacation in Europe

E.

Volume:  06
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  292
Date:  01/1890


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