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Negro is Known
			
412                    CHURCH REVIEW.

And if with the great levers of industry, education and wealth,
we do not succeed in becoming great and fertile in original re-
source, then has the history of all nations proved a delusion, and,
verily, life itself a failure.
  Philadelphia, January 30th, 1891.


                              XI.
                     THE NEGRO IS KNOWN.

                        R. R. DOWNS.

  MUCH has been said and written-too much--concerning the
Negro's faithfulness and affection for his master's family during
the Rebellion, notwithstanding the fact and his knowledge of
the too often harsh and cruel treatment he received from that
master. In saying this we speak advisedly, for many masters
were truly considerate, kind and even brotherly--fatherly, too, in
tenderness to their slaves, and in the black bosoms of those
emancipated slaves their memory is justly held sacred, for in
some instances those slaves have had to face the stern realities
of life's struggle with more brawn and muscle than they did in
the house of bondage. But I am speaking generally of the treat-
ment of the Negro in slavery. Now, Negro apologists, with their
watery eyes, go sniffling over the country with a "sorry-we-are-
here-and-sorry-we-are-living" manner, basing their pusillanimous
effort of speech-making on the Negro's "faithfulness to old mas-
ter's family during the war."
  This kind of effusive oratory is altogether too sentimental and
has made me tired, and I am sure that sputtering stuff has in
no sense helped the Negro, and am positively sure that it has
and still does lessen his manhood and depreciates his sense
of honor and justice. The future historian and statesman of
the coming Negro will laugh such stuff to scorn. That bom-
bast served its purpose while the Southern heart dejectedly
mourned and bled for her slain sons on many a battlefield and in
poverty-stricken homes; the worn and sad faces of her daughters,
whose proud and beautiful forms were meanly attired, and whose
only dependence in those awful days was the scant produce of
many princely estates, while the fathers, husbands and sons were
far away, undergoing and suffering the hardships of a soldier or
locked a captive in the dungeons of the victor.
  That balderdash was then in its glory, and held the scepter
for some years after, but now--well it is an old worn piece, and
literally worn to shreds, played out, and should be put away in
the dusty records of the past as a back number.




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 07, Num. 4

Negro is Known

R.

Volume:  07
Issue Number:  04
Page Number:  412
Date:  04/1891


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