OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
1 
Item Description Next Next
Editorial
			

                           XVIII.

                         Editorial.

                 THE WESLEYAN MOVEMENT.

  WHAT Methodist is not familiar with the following: "In the latter
end of the year 1739, eight or ten persons came to Mr. Wesley in
London, who appeared to be deeply convinced of sin, and earnestly
groaning after redemption." After speaking of others who joined
their number, and how they were received by Mr. Wesley, the
" General Rules " continue: " This was the rise of the United
Society, first in Europe and then in America."
  The Fall of 1739 begins the Methodist movement, and the
spring of 1791 marks the date when the great founder passed
from labor to reward. Over fifty years were given him to wit-
ness the progress of the work which he organized. And now,
after it has been managed entirely by other hands for one hun-
dred years, the question is asked, What are the results of the
movement ? The Independent, according to its usual progressive-
ness, takes the lead in giving a galaxy of opinions and statistics.
In this symposium Bishop John E. Hurst is the first to speak,
taking for his subject " The Character and Work of John Wes-
ley." This is followed by an article from Archdeacon Farrar
on " The Wesleyan Movement and the Church of England."
All the different branches of Methodism are heard from, and the
twenty pages of Thle Independent that are devoted to the discus-
sion afford interesting and profitable reading matter for Christian
people in general, and for Christian workers especially. Bishop
Hurst calls attention to the great catholicity of Wesley, and
shows how he could see and appropriate the good that was in
Nonconformists, Deists, the Church of England, Catholicism,
Heretics, and even Montanus.
  The Independent, in an editorial, compares the Wesleyan move-
ment with primitive Christianity. We quote the following: "The
Apostolic heralds presented the simple gospel as a universal
gospel, designed for all men, especially for sinners, either in or
out of the Jewish Church. Wesley entered upon his ministra-
tions with the declaration, The world is my parish, and, in a sense
which could not have been in his thought when he uttered it,
the world has become his parish. Methodism is universal, and
presents a universal salvation."
  Archdeacon Farrar shows a great familiarity with the history
and work of Methodism, and writes strongly and impartially
concerning its good effect upon the Church of England. Says
he, "The thing which the Church of England in the eighteenth
century was most afraid of, the one thing which she denounced




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
Item Description Next Next

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 07, Num. 4

Editorial

Volume:  07
Issue Number:  04
Page Number:  444
Date:  04/1891


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.